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    Marijuana proponents were elated Tuesday after major cannabis measures passed in Michigan and Missouri and Democrats took control of the House.

    The victories — for recreational cannabis in Michigan and medical marijuana in Missouri — have emboldened some leaders in the prohibition reform movement to declare that they'll push for legalization in the House, NBC News reported. Utah voters also approved the legalization of medical marijuana. 

    "We are going for the jugular on this issue," said Michael Collins, interim director of national affairs for the Drug Policy Alliance.

    Michigan's initiative will tax and regulate sales of marijuana for those 21 and older. Missouri will allow medical use for doctor-approved patients who have certain conditions.

    Pot proponents were also claiming victory in key congressional races. Longtime incumbent Rep. Pete Sessions, R-Texas, was defeated Tuesday by Democrat Colin Allred. As chairman of the House Rules Committee, Sessions repeatedly blocked pro-marijuana legislation.



    Photo Credit: Richard Vogel/AP, File

    This file photo from Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, shows a marijuana plant at SLOgrown Genetics in the coastal mountain range of San Luis Obispo, California.This file photo from Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, shows a marijuana plant at SLOgrown Genetics in the coastal mountain range of San Luis Obispo, California.

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    The woman charged in the Brooklyn crash that killed Broadway star Ruthie Ann Miles' young daughter and unborn child has died of an apparent suicide, a senior law enforcement official briefed on the case tells NBC 4 New York.

    Dorothy Bruns, 44, was found dead in her Staten Island home Tuesday afternoon, the senior law enforcement official said. Authorities say pills and a note were found nearby.

    Miles was walking with her friend and their two young children in Park Slope on March 5 when Bruns allegedly blew through a red light and plowed into the group, killing both children — Miles’ daughter, Abigail, and the friend's 1-year-old son, Joshua. All four were found on the pavement with various injuries.

    Miles' unborn daughter initially survived the crash, but the actress miscarried a month before she was due. The loss was related to injuries from the crash. 

    Bruns was eventually indicted in connection with the case; she was arrested at her Staten Island home May 3 on a 10-count indictment charging her with manslaughter, criminally negligent homicide, assault and other crimes. She had faced 15 years in jail. 

    Bruns told police at the time she had medical issues — and though her license had been suspended she had not been criminally charged in the case until about two months after the crash. Prosecutors said she had suffered a seizure at the time of the collision, and had been driving in direct defiance of a doctor's orders following a hospitalization less than eight weeks prior. That hospitalization stemmed from yet another car crash — that time into a parked vehicle.

    Police are investigating Bruns' death, the senior law enforcement official said. 



    Photo Credit: Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

    FILE - In this June 7, 2015 file photo, Ruthie Ann Miles accepts the award for best performance by an actress in a featured role in a musical for FILE - In this June 7, 2015 file photo, Ruthie Ann Miles accepts the award for best performance by an actress in a featured role in a musical for "The King & I" at the 69th annual Tony Awards in New York. Miles was injured and her 4-year-old daughter Abigail was killed along with a 1-year-old when a driver lost control of her vehicle and slammed into them on a Brooklyn street. Police say Miles was walking with a friend who had the infant in a stroller when the driver struck them. Police say 1-year-old Joshua Lew was also killed. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File)

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    Editor's Note: The voting results of each proposition will be updated below. 

    There were ballot measures that could change the way you eat, how much you pay for gas, and even change the time of day in California in Tuesday's statewide election.

    Scroll down for results updates. 

    Prop 1: Veterans' Home Loans

    With 23,622 of 24,312 precincts reporting (97 percent)

    Yes, 3,651,760 - 54 percent

    No, 3,095,915 - 46 percent

    This proposal allows the state to sell general obligation bonds for $4 billion to finance affordable housing for low-income people, including war veterans.

    Its financial impact in California is an increase in state costs to reimburse the average amount of these bonds of about $170 million per year over the next 35 years.

    Those for the measure say the best part is it finds a solution, while not raising taxes. 

    Those against the measure say there are better ways to fix California's housing crisis. They also argue it would waste taxpayer money on interest payments.

    Prop 2: Homelessness Prevention

    With 23,258 of 24,312 precincts reporting (96 percent)

    x-Yes, 4,136,994 - 61 percent 

    No, 2,629,166 - 39 percent

    This proposal would allow the state to use funds from county mental health programs to fund housing for the homeless with mental issues.

    The approval of this proposal would not increase state taxes and makes the existing legislation that establishes the program official.

    Homeless advocates, social workers, doctors and emergency responders urge voters to say yes to Prop 2.

    Those against it however, say it makes no sense to take money away from mental health services to build homes with that money. 

    Prop 3: Water and Environmental Projects

    With 23,258 of 24,312 precincts reporting (96 percent)

    Yes, 3,187,440 - 48 percent

    No, 3,501,515 - 52 percent

    The proposition authorizes the use of $8.877 billion in general obligation state bonds to finance aquifer and environmental projects.

    The fiscal impact for the state would be the increase in costs to pay bonds of $430 million as an annual average for more than 40 years. However, the state government could save hundreds of millions of dollars annually in water-related projects in the coming decades.

    Proponents say it is a measure that will guarantee safe drinking water and drought protection. But those against it say it hands money over to a lot of different organizations, but doesn't provide a new way of getting clean water. 

    They also say "interest payments on the bonds will double the amount that has to be repaid." They say it does nothing to solve our water shortage problems. 

    Prop 4: Children's Hospitals

    With 23,258 of 24,312 precincts reporting (96 percent)

    x-Yes, 4,098,796 - 61 percent

    No, 2,666,599 - 39 percent

    It would allow the state to sell $1.5 billion in general obligation bonds to finance the construction, expansion, renovation and equipping of children's hospitals.

    The fiscal impact for the state would be the increase in costs to reimburse bonds of $80 million per year over the next 35 years.

    Those for the measure argue the hospital systems are like cellphones -- think of how much they've increased in technology over the last 10 years. They argue the demand for specialized pediatric care has only gone up, and hospitals are needed to meet that demand.

    Those against say the proposition really only benefits the hospitals backing the measure, and that the money could be spent in a better way. 

    Prop 5: Home-buyers' Taxes

    With 23,258 of 24,312 precincts reporting (96 percent)

    Yes, 2,815,851 - 42 percent

    x-No, 3,909,288 - 58 percent

    The approval of this prop would allow all homeowners over 55 years of age, of any property contaminated or affected by a natural disaster, and severely disabled owners, to be eligible for property tax savings should they move to another home.

    The fiscal impact would be for schools and local governments, which would lose more than $100 million per year in property taxes.

    It essentially the "moving penalty."

    Those against it say it cuts "$1 billion in local revenue from public schools, fire, police, health care and other services" but doesn't build any new housing. They say it's going to make it harder for cities to pay for schools while giving a nice tax break to the wealthy.

    Prop 6: Gas Tax

    With 24,312 of 24,312 precincts reported (100 percent)

    Yes, 3,141,881 - 45 percent

    x-No, 3,857,819 - 55 percent

    Prop 6 would have repealed a 12-cent gas tax and an increase in vehicle registration that was approved last year to fund road fixes and better transit programs. The aim was to pay for $5 billion a year in improvements, and raise $52 billion over a decade for road repairs. The gas tax took effect last November.

    Construction industry and firefighter unions opposed repealing the measure.

    Former Republican councilman Carl DeMaio proposed it, saying the cost of living in California is outrageous enough as it is.

    "Everything in California is so much more expensive and the question is why," he once said.

    Voting no keeps the tax right where it is.

    Opponents say since cars are becoming more energy efficient and using less gas, there won't be enough funds to support the program.

    Opponents contend there aren't enough funds to keep up with the transit needs of California's 40 million people. Over the last two decades, automobiles have become more fuel efficient — a boon for the environment but a challenge to transportation budgets as drivers need less gasoline.

    Prop 7: Daylight Saving Time

    With 23,258 of 24,312 precincts reporting (96 percent)

    x-Yes, 4,014,400 - 60 percent

    No, 2,694,858 - 40 percent

    Daylight saving time may not seem that big of a deal to most Californians, but it’s a divided issue.

    If Californians vote yes, they’d be asking to end daylight saving time, meaning no "spring forward" nor "fall back." But voting yes wouldn’t make it a done deal -- the measure would still need to clear the hurdle in the federal government. The measure would need a two-thirds vote from the Legislature.

    Basically, the time wouldn’t change twice a year, like in other states that don’t follow Daylight Saving Time: Hawaii and Arizona (except for in Arizona’s Navajo Nation).

    Voting no would mean that everything would stay how it is – you lose an hour in spring, and gain an hour in fall.

    Some proponents say the idea is very outdated. It all started during WWI as an energy saving program. They argue that studies have shown that daylight saving time may actually increase electricity use in the summertime. They also argue that daylight saving time would cause more pedestrian crashes because the sun sometimes doesn’t rise until 8 a.m. in winter.

    Those who are against the measure say it’s too much change, and Californians are used to switching their clocks back and forth.

    Prop 8: Dialysis Clinics Refunds

    With 24,312 of 24,312 precincts reporting (100 percent)

    Yes, 2,660,633 - 38 percent

    x-No, 4,260,758 - 62 percent 

    Proposition 8, while at first glance is not as controversial as the gas tax or daylight savings props, actually is a source of heated debate. If passed, it would cap profits at kidney dialysis clinics by using a formula.

    Proponents of 8 say big dialysis companies are netting monster profits without putting enough money back into sanitation and patient care. Those in support, like the Democratic Party and veterans, say the proposition would stop the companies from overcharging, and would help provide quality care for patients.

    But those against the prop – which includes nurses, doctors and physicians – say many clinics would be forced to close if the prop passes. Many people without functioning kidneys depend on the clinics, and those against the prop say it would increase costs for tax payers, and reduce access to care because clinics would have to close.

    Prop 10: Regulating Rent

    With 24,312 of 24,312 precincts reporting (100 percent)

    Yes, 2,675,378 - 38 percent

    x-No, 4,310,298 - 62 percent 

    This was set to be a big source of debate in November. Voting yes would have meant state law would not limit rent control laws in cities and counties. What that means is it would establish rent control authority in communities, in hopes to keep people in their homes and reduce the homeless population.

    But those opposing the measure say that if state law is not allowed to continue overseeing rent control, it would actually make the housing crisis worse. They argue Prop 10 is bad for homeowners because it allows the regulation of single family homes and would allow more fees on top of rent.

    Those against it say it will hurt homeowners because it will lower real estate values. They also say it would limit new construction and cut the already-choked housing supply in California. Opponents also say landlords who managed smaller properties would struggle or be pushed out.

    Prop 10 repeals Costa-Hawkins Housing Act, and it is one of the most expensive propositions on the ballot.

    According to the state, renters in California already spend more than half their income on rent.

    Those in favor say Prop 10 would help people getting pushed out of their homes, because it would control how much landlords increase rent per year as well as regulate how much they are asking of new renters.

    Prop 11: On Call Ambulances

    With 23,258 of 24,312 precincts reporting (96 percent)

    x-Yes, 4,019,252 - 59 percent

    No, 2,744,992 - 41 percent 

    With Prop 11, ambulance workers would have to stay on call during their paid lunchbreaks so they could respond to 911 calls. It would also give them more training. Proponents argue it's a proposition that would save lives.

    Voting no means EMT's and paramedics would have to remain unreachable while on a paid break, and cannot provide care, even if they are the closest ambulance available.

    State Assembly Member Freddie Rodriguez argues however that the proposition is not what it seems.

    Rodriguez says it would allow private companies to get out of paying millions in wages.

    Prop 12: Ban Selling Meat From Confined Animals

    With 23,258 of 24,312 precincts reporting (96 percent)

    x-Yes, 4,126,366 - 61 percent

    No, 2,635,545 - 39 percent 

    A yes vote requires farmers to provide more space to caged animals used for meat or food, like egg-laying hens, pigs, and calves. It would ban the sale of meat and eggs from animals in cages that do not meet specific measurements. 

    If it sounds familiar, it's because in 2008, Prop 2 was passed preventing caged animals from being raised in confinements so small they couldn’t move.

    But it’s back in the form of Prop 12, because out-of-state farmers aren’t subjected to the same requirements. Also, there were no specific measurements in Prop 2.

    Hens would also have to be totally cage free by 2022.

    Starting in 2020, a calf would have to be given at least 43 square feet of floor space.

    Pigs would need 24 square feet starting in 2022.

    In 2020, egg-laying hens, would need 1 square foot of floor space each – the cages would be totally gone by 2022.

    Costs would probably rise for the foods produced by using meat and eggs from these animals, the state's nonpartisan Legislative Analyst's Office found.

    The Association of California Egg Farmers says it could cause a shortage of eggs for sale because farmers would have to make a lot of unforeseen changes to structures.



    Photo Credit: Getty

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    Sledding around Los Angeles?

    It isn't a thing, sorry and nope.

    We may zip around by car, by bus, by scooter, by bicycle, via tricycle, or on foot, but hauling out a snow-sliding device, the kind with the quaint, curled-up front, an old rope for reins, and a greased bottom, is a sight regularly seen on Christmas cards but not our freeways.

    And yet? You may be so inclined to summon such a retro ride, starting on Saturday, Nov. 10, when one of the first of the major Southern California mall trees begins its yearly twinkle.

    If only there was a sled app in SoCal. If only.

    We're referring here to the tree at the Citadel Outlets, the sky-high fir that's been dubbed the "World's Tallest Live-Cut Christmas Tree," and when it begins to shine, as it will on the evening of Nov. 10, it shines stupendously.

    Why?

    Count 'em up: There are over 18,000 LED lights in all on this titan of a tree, so, actually, don't count 'em up. Just marvel and enjoy.

    And plan to enjoy the free entertainment, too, that's on the 2018 line-up. Singers Maddie Poppe and Caleb Lee Hutchinson will perform, as will John Lindahl and The All-American Boys Chorus.

    It's an event, by the by, that's gained a rep for featuring soon-to-break-out stars; Ariana Grande and Justin Bieber both appeared at past tree lightings.

    The hours are 4:30, when it is still light, to 7:30, when it is not, but arrive close to dark to see the sparkly branches go aglow. Of course, plenty of people will be there, so arriving earlier is always best.

    Ready to sled to the Citadel? The 17th annual Citadel Tree Lighting Concert is set to start the season on Nov. 10, 2018.



    Photo Credit: Citadel Outlets

    It's the It's the "World's Tallest Live-Cut Christmas Tree," and it will be lit for the first time, on Saturday evening, Nov. 10.

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    A Democratic newcomer appeared to have prevailed in a tight race early Wednesday with an incumbent Republican for a Congressional seat that represents the northern reaches of Los Angeles County.

    Democrats put their hopes behind Katie Hill in her bid to unseat Republican Rep. Steve Knight in a district that stretches into Ventura County. The area is historically Republican, but 25th District voters went for Clinton in the presidential race two years ago, and recent polls show the race to be extremely close.

    Hill was leading with 51 percent of the vote early Wednesday. 

    Knight is an Army veteran and former Los Angeles police officer who supported the Trump tax cuts and efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, known as Obamacare. Hill is a former executive for a homeless-services nonprofit agency, and she has expressed support for improvements in security on the U.S.-Mexico border and additional middle-class tax cuts. 



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Voters fill out their ballots at a polling place to participate in early voting in California's 25th Congressional district on November 4, 2018 in Lancaster, California.Voters fill out their ballots at a polling place to participate in early voting in California's 25th Congressional district on November 4, 2018 in Lancaster, California.

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    The surge of women running in the midterm elections, many of them Democrats spurred by antipathy toward President Donald Trump, smashed a U.S. House of Representatives record, with at least 98 winning election or re-election by Wednesday morning.

    Their victories eclipsed the current tally of 84 seats held by women in the current House session. 

    The elections got off to a promising start for breaking barriers not only in the House but also the U.S. Senate and governor's races with the first result to be recorded: the territory of Guam chose Democrat Lou Leon Guerrero as its first female governor.

    When the first flip of a House seat of Tuesday night came, from Republican to Democrat, it was in a Virginia race where state Sen. Jennifer Wexton defeated the two-term GOP incumbent, Barbara Comstock. The second Democratic gain went to a woman, too. Donna Shalala, secretary of Health and Human Services under President Bill Clinton, beat Republican Maria Elvira Salazar to replace Republican Rep. Ileana Pos-Lehtinen.

    By the end of the night, Democrats had taken control of the House.

    Other firsts among Democratic women: Sharice Davids became the first gay, Native-American congresswoman in Kansas while in New York, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez became the youngest woman elected to Congress at 29. The first Muslim-American women were elected, Rashida Tlaib in Michigan and Ilhan Omar in Minnesota. Pennsylvania went from having no women in its delegation to having four. A surprise win came in in Oklahoma where Kendra Horn won what was thought a safe House seat for Republicans. And Ayanna Pressley will become the fist black woman in Congress representing Massachusetts.

    In the governor's races, Laura Kelly beat Republican Secretary of State Kris Kobach in Kansas and Gretchen Whitmer won in Michigan. In New Mexico,  Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham was projected to become the first Democratic Hispanic woman to be elected governor.

    Among Republicans, Rep. Marsha Blackburn, was elected Tennessee’s first woman U.S. senator. In the gubernatorial races, Republican Kay Ivey retained her seat in Alabama.

    "We’re seeing this pretty important shift in the makeup, especially on the Democratic side, in terms of the leadership and who are going to be the rising stars in that party," said Eric Schickler, the Jeffrey & Ashley McDermott Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. "I do think that is one of the noteworthy shifts. Whenever there’s an open seat or a potential vulnerable Republican, female candidates did really well, probably mobilized in part by anger over Trump. And I expect to see that continue."

    But some incumbents suffered losses. Senators Heidi Heitkamp in North Dakota and Claire McCaskill in Missouri, Democrats serving in red states, came up short.

    Challenger Amy McGrath, who became the first woman Marine to pilot an F-18 in combat, lost in Kentucky for a House seat.

    A record number of women ran for office this year: 237 women for the House, up from 167 four years ago, and 23 women for the Senate, beating 2012’s record of 18, according to The Center for American Women and Politics, a division of the Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers University. Sixteen women ran for governor.

    Democrats led in nominations: 77 percent of women in the House, Senate and governor’s races.

    Among progressive Democratic women, the 2016 presidential election appeared to have been a catalyst, said Kelly Dittmar, the center’s Gender Watch 2018 project director.

    “Even if they were already engaged in politics in other ways, their sense of urgency for making their voice heard in politics was even greater after the 2016 election,” she said. “Because — not just Donald Trump specifically, I think he’s often given credit in this — but more generally that it was going to be a Republican controlled government.”

    They competed to preserve health care, preserve environmental regulations and push back against other parts of the Republican agenda, she said. Many were first time candidates who worried less than women before them about having all of the right experience and credentials. Trump’s success, against Hillary Clinton, a candidate with more government qualifications, may have convinced them to dive in, Dittmar said.

    Early results from the NBC News Exit Poll showed a divide between the parties on the importance of electing more women to public office. Some 46 percent of voters said it was very important for more women to be elected; among them a large majority of Democrats, but just 18 percent of Republicans and 41 percent of independents.

    Another window into voters’ positions was their view of the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh, accused on sexual misconduct, to the U.S. Supreme Court. Voters were more likely to oppose than support his appointment, 48 percent to 43 percent, and women even more so, 53 percent to 37 percent in support. Men on the other hand supported it 50 percent to 44 percent against.

    Sierra Jackson contributed to this story.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images; AP Images
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    From top-left, clockwise: Donna Shalala, projected winner of Florida's 27th congressional district; Rashida Tlaib, projected winner of Michigan's 13th district; Marsha Blackburn, projected winner for Tennessee senator; Ilhan Omar, projected winner of Minnesota's 5th district; Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, projected winner of New York's 14th district; Sharice Davids, projected winner of Kansas's 3rd district; Jennifer Wexton, projected winner of Virginia's 10th district; Kendra Horn, projected winner of Oklahoma's 5th district.From top-left, clockwise: Donna Shalala, projected winner of Florida's 27th congressional district; Rashida Tlaib, projected winner of Michigan's 13th district; Marsha Blackburn, projected winner for Tennessee senator; Ilhan Omar, projected winner of Minnesota's 5th district; Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, projected winner of New York's 14th district; Sharice Davids, projected winner of Kansas's 3rd district; Jennifer Wexton, projected winner of Virginia's 10th district; Kendra Horn, projected winner of Oklahoma's 5th district.

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    The son of a couple who died in a fire that appeared to have been intentionally set at their Diamond Bar home was charged Wednesday with two counts of murder.

    Detectives had asked the public to help them find Ryan Michael Venti, 33, in connection with the house fire in which his parents, Linda Venti, 66, and John Venti, 75, were found dead. The couple's dog also died in the arson fire. 

    In addition to the murder counts, Venti was charged with a special circumstance allegation of multiple murders and one count each of arson of an inhabited structure and cruelty to an animal.

    Arraignment was scheduled for Wednesday. He is being held without bail.

    The fire was reported about 5 a.m. Friday in the 3600 block of Crooked Creek Drive, and it took firefighters about 40 minutes to knock down the flames. The badly burned bodies of two victims were found in a bedroom, along with the charred remains of the dog.

    Sheriff's Lt. John Corina said investigators were working to determine if the victims were killed before the fire.

    There were no working smoke detectors inside the home.



    Photo Credit: Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department Information Bureau

    Ryan Michael Venti is pictuered in this photo provided by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.Ryan Michael Venti is pictuered in this photo provided by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.

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    Gravy is, well, gravy, in the different and complimentary sense of the word, and biscuits? Bready bliss.

    But the concept of stuffing, that classic and carb-tastic holiday dish, can send a pair of chummy foodie friends in completely opposite directions.

    Should the stuffing rock raisins or currants? Are croutons okay or is fresher bread the way to go? And can rosemary overwhelm or enhance?

    It's a dish that wears hundreds of different guises, truly. But the Thanksgiving Stuffing set to show up at 6111 Melrose on the morning of Wednesday, Nov. 21 won't deal directly with raisins, rosemary, or any quibble-worthy ingredient; rather, it is something everyone can warmly agree upon.

    Why?

    Because "Thanksgiving Stuffing" isn't an edible stuffing, but rather spirited, help-out morning devoted to a gracious, give-back effort: To "... fill bags with delicious holiday food for thousands of hungry and grateful people."

    You can join in, too, by signing up with Big Sunday.

    What to expect as you fill those bags with food donated by a host of businesses and organizations? Look for "arts & crafts, great bluegrass music, and, as always, a fun and friendly community breakfast for everyone!"

    It all begins at 9 a.m., and wraps up by noon, so you can head home to your own kitchen, to begin your own Thanksgiving preparations, and the making of your own version of stuffing, whether it contains raisins or croutons or rosemary or a bunch of other things that your friends and family especially adore.

    And keep in mind that there are other ways to give back with Big Sunday, including donations.

    Can you make it to the Melrose HQ on Nov. 21 to fill food bags? Or send some money to the organization in support of our neighbors and communities?

    Start here, on this page, gobble gobble. And here's to celebrating stuffing, both the raisin-filled kind and the reason-filled kind, too.



    Photo Credit: Big Sunday

    No turkey suit is required, by a desire to connect and support other Southern Californians, this Thanksgiving, is a wonderful thing to have. Be at Big Sunday's Melrose HQ on the morning of Wednesday, Nov. 21.No turkey suit is required, by a desire to connect and support other Southern Californians, this Thanksgiving, is a wonderful thing to have. Be at Big Sunday's Melrose HQ on the morning of Wednesday, Nov. 21.

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    Most congressional and gubernatorial races for the 2018 midterm elections have been called, but a few elections are still awaiting decisions. In two toss-up Senate elections, Republicans have narrow leads. Republicans also have narrow leads in some gubernatorial races. Democrats are leading in half of the House races that have not yet been called. 

    Here’s where the results stand for some of the key contests as of Wednesday morning:

    Mississippi Senate Special Election Goes to Runoff
    A GOP favored Senate race in Mississippi between incumbent Republican Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith and Democrat Michael Epsy, a former U.S. secretary of agriculture, resulted in a run-off because neither candidate garnered 50 percent of the vote, NBC News reported. Hyde-Smith notched 41.5 percent of the vote and Espy 40.6 percent, with 99 percent of precincts reporting. Another Republican, Chris McDaniel, had 16.5 percent. The special election was held to fill a seat by retired Sen. Thad Cochran. Hyde-Smith and Epsy next compete in a runoff on Tuesday, Nov. 27, NBC News reported. 

    Arizona Senate Too Close to Call Before Historic Outcome
    In the U.S. Senate race to represent Arizona, Republican Rep. Martha McSally has a 0.9 percentage point lead over Democratic Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, the pair separated by nearly 16,000 votes with 75 percent of results in. McSally, a former combat pilot, competed against Sinema, a former Green party activist who campaigned as a pragmatist for the seat held by outgoing GOP Sen. Jeff Flake. Whoever wins will become Arizona's first female senator. It could take days before the victor is determined, the Arizona Republic reported. "There are a lot of outstanding ballots – especially those mailed-in – and a lot of reasons to feel good!" Sinema tweeted Wednesday. The Maricopa County recorder’s office had 472,000 ballots left to count, according to KPNX reporter Brahm Resnik.   

    Florida Senate Expected to Go to Recount
    In the Florida race for U.S. Senate, Republican Gov. Rick Scott has a .4 percentage point lead over three-term Democrat incumbent Sen. Bill Nelson, with 99 percent of the vote in. State law requires a recount when candidates are within one-half a point of each other. Nelson’s chief of staff said that the candidate has no intentions to concede the race, a move that Scott's campaign slammed after having declared victory. “This race is over. It’s a sad way for Bill Nelson to end his career," spokesman Chris Hartline told NBC. "He is desperately trying to hold on to something that no longer exists." Florida officials will not order a recount until the first set of official returns are due on Saturday, The Associated Press reported.  

    Will Stacey Abrams Force a Runoff in Georgia?
    Georgia’s much-watched election for governor between Republican two-term Secretary of State Brian Kemp and Democrat Stacey Abrams, a lawyer, former state legislative leader and romance novelist, is also still too close to call. Kemp has a 1.7 percentage point lead with 99 percent of the votes in for the race, for a lead of 66,316 votes. Kemp said that even with absentee, mail-in and provisional ballots left to count the "math is on our side." Abrams' campaign countered that there are at least 87,000 early votes and mail-in ballots left to count that could help them trigger a runoff, The Associated Press reported. Abrams campaign estimates it needs to notch nearly 25,000 votes to do so. She would become the nation's first black female governor, if elected.      

    14 House Races Yet to Be Decided
    There are also 14 House races that still have no apparent winner, six of them in California. Democrats currently lead in seven races: three in California and one each in Maine, Washington, Georgia and Utah. Republican candidates lead in seven: three in California and one each in Georgia, Minnesota, North Carolina and New Jersey. 

    Among the candidates still fighting to stay ahead of their opponents is Democrat Gil Cisneros for California’s 2nd District. Cisneros is a former Navy veteran and lottery winner.
    Republican incumbent Rep. Dana Rohrabacher in California’s 48th District is also struggling to get ahead of his challenger. Rohrabacher has cast himself as a maverick, but his Russia-friendly behavior became a weapon for the Democrats trying defeat him.
    Republican incumbent Rep. Mia Love is also facing the possibility of a narrow loss for Utah’s 4th District. Love famously refused to vote for President Trump as the Republican candidate for president in 2016. At a press conference Wednesday, Trump commented on the race by saying, “Mia Love gave me no love. And she lost.”

    Among the candidates still fighting to stay ahead of their opponents is Democrat Gil Cisneros for California’s 2nd District. Cisneros is a former Navy veteran and lottery winner.

    Republican incumbent Rep. Dana Rohrabacher in California’s 48th District is also struggling to get ahead of his challenger. Rohrabacher has cast himself as a maverick, but his Russia-friendly behavior became a weapon for the Democrats trying defeat him.

    Republican incumbent Rep. Mia Love is also facing the possibility of a narrow loss for Utah’s 4th District. Love famously refused to vote for President Trump as the Republican candidate for president in 2016. At a press conference Wednesday, Trump commented on the race by saying, “Mia Love gave me no love. And she lost.”

    —Daniel Macht and The Associated Press contributed to this report.  



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    A file photo of a ballot.A file photo of a ballot.

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    Attorney General Jeff Sessions has resigned "at the request" of President Donald Trump, according to a letter he submitted to the White House, released Wednesday. 

    Here is the complete text of that undated letter.  



    Photo Credit: Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images
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    Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks at a press conference about the apprehension of a suspect in the recent spate of mail bombings at the Department of Justice on Oct. 26, 2018, in Washington, D.C.Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks at a press conference about the apprehension of a suspect in the recent spate of mail bombings at the Department of Justice on Oct. 26, 2018, in Washington, D.C.

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    It was an emotional night for candidates and their supporters in some of the 2018 midterm election's most hotly contested races in California. For some, the tension mounted into the next day as they waited for results to trickle in.

    Photo Credit: AP

    A look at reactions to election night around California.A look at reactions to election night around California.

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    The first day of November left Southern Californians with a sunset to remember when the western sky exploded in a canvas of bright pastel colors, a stunning sight captured in photos from around the region.

    Photo Credit: Robert Medina

    A view of the Tuesday Nov. 6, 2018 sunrise from the Baldwin Hills overlook.A view of the Tuesday Nov. 6, 2018 sunrise from the Baldwin Hills overlook.

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    Black Tap Craft Burgers & Beer, a New York-based restaurant known for outlandish milkshakes and decadent burgers, is hosting a job fair looking to hire job seekers to work at their new Downtown Disney District spot.

    The job fair will be held Thursday, Oct. 25, and Nov. 14 and 15, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

    Interviews for all restaurant positions will be held in-person at Splitsville, the groovy bowling alley next door to the forthcoming Black Tap. Head to the second floor.

    Head on over to 1530 S. Disneyland Drive on those days. You can score free parking, as long as you get validation from Black Tap -- just remember to bring your ticket.

    Black Tap offers a New York feel with award-winning burgers and their unique CrazyShake milkshakes. If ever in need of photos worth sharing on Instagram, Black Tap is the place to go.

    Black Tap opened its first location in 2015 at New York's SoHo neighborhood. Today, there are three New York restaurants, as well as locations in Las Vegas, Dubai, Geneva and Singapore.

    The Downtown Disney location will be opening Winter 2018/2019.

    You can find more places hiring for the holidays here.



    Photo Credit: Black Tap Craft Burgers & Beer

    Black Tap Craft Burgers & Beer is opening a location at the Downtown Disney District, and they're hiring. Job fairs will be held Oct. 25, and Nov, 14-15, 2018.Black Tap Craft Burgers & Beer is opening a location at the Downtown Disney District, and they're hiring. Job fairs will be held Oct. 25, and Nov, 14-15, 2018.

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    FBI agents were at the home and City Hall office of Los Angeles council member Wednesday serving an unspecified search warrant, law enforcement sources told NBC Investigations.

    The federal warrant is being served at the office and home of Councilman Jose Huizar, law enforcement sources familiar with the case told NBC Investigations. 

    FBI officials had no immediate comment on whose office or offices were being searched or which individuals may be the targeted of the search because the warrant is sealed. There is no known threat to the public, according to the sources.

    No arrest appears imminent in the case, according to two law enforcement sources, and it was unclear what agents were searching for.

    The Los Angeles Times reported that agents were seen carrying boxes out of the office. Aerial video showed agents filling boxes at the council member's home. 

    NBC4 has reached out to Huizar's office for comment. 

    Huizar was elected to the council in 2005. He represents the Boyle Heights, Eagle Rock and downtown Los Angeles areas. 

    Huizar was the target of two recent lawsuits by two former employees who accused him of doctoring his schedule in an attempt to hide information from the media.

    His wife, Richelle Huizar, is running in the 2020 election to succeed him in Los Angeles' 14th District. Jose Huizar will term-out at that time.

    Stephen Kaufman, an attorney for Huizar, told City News Service he was monitoring the situation, but had no further comment. Huizar has denied the accusations contained in both lawsuits. 

    NBC4's Jonathan Lloyd contributed to this report.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Councilman Jose Huizar speaks at The Midnight Mission's 11th Annual Golden Hearts Awards on May 9, 2011 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images)Councilman Jose Huizar speaks at The Midnight Mission's 11th Annual Golden Hearts Awards on May 9, 2011 in Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images)

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    Paul Manafort's former son-in-law was arrested for allegedly engaging in wire fraud and identity theft in a high-end real estate scam in Los Angeles, NBC News reported.

    Jeffrey Yohai had already pleaded guilty to different real estate-related financial crimes and was out on bond when he engaged in activities "strikingly like" what he had earlier admitted, federal prosecutors alleged in a criminal complaint unsealed Wednesday.

    Yohai, who divorced Jessica Manafort in August 2017, did deals with Paul Manafort, which special counsel Robert Mueller and federal prosecutors have examined. The complaint alleges he made false statements to investors during a lunch to the effect that "he 'turned state's evidence' on … Manafort" and "that he had to go to 'D.C.'" to meet with staff from Mueller's office or "downtown" to meet with "the feds."

    Yoahi was expected to make an initial appearance on the new charges Wednesday afternoon.



    Photo Credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images, File

    This June 15, 2018, file photo shows former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort arrive at the E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse in Washington, D.C., for a hearing.This June 15, 2018, file photo shows former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort arrive at the E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse in Washington, D.C., for a hearing.

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    Former Mayor Rudy Giuliani spent nearly $900,000 since April, including around $12,000 on cigars and $7,100 on pens, his wife claimed at a divorce proceeding.

    Judith Giuliani and her husband of 15 years appeared in court Wednesday in New York City in the wake of their divorce filings.

    Court papers claim Rudy Giuliani, 74, spent nearly $900,000 since April, including $286,532 to support his alleged mistress, Maria Rosa Ryan, $447,938 “for his own enjoyment” and $165,165 for travel expenses.

    His wife’s counsel, meanwhile, claimed her husband spent $12,012 on cigars and $7,131 on pens since April, while simultaneously cutting her off from their credit cards.

    In response to his wife’s claims, Giuliani claimed he was dealing with a diminished income.

    His wife’s attorney, however, maintained he shouldn’t have agreed to work for President Donald Trump “for free.”

    Giuliani previously called the situation between him and his wife “amicable.”

    “In these divorce situations, you cannot place blame, it is 50/50, there are problems on both sides, Giuliani told the Post back in April.

    Toward the end of their court appearance, Judge Michael Katz urged the two to work through their issues privately with their lawyers before seeking third-party discovery.

    “It is beyond me why this is done publicly… throwing out all [your] dirty laundry for consumption,” Judge Katz said.

    The two married in 2003 in what was the third marriage for both of them.

    Giuliani was mayor of New York from 1994 to 2001.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images/File

    Rudy Giuliani and his wife Judith in 2016.Rudy Giuliani and his wife Judith in 2016.

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    Nosh on tamales, pozole, and shrimp & grits at the Festive Foods Marketplace, part of the annual Disney California Adventure holiday celebration.

    Photo Credit: Disneyland Resort

    The turkey & stuffing tamale with cranberry relish can be found at the Merry Mashups marketplace during Disney Festival of Holidays at Disney California Adventure Park. The festival, taking place Nov. 9, 2018, through Jan. 8, 2019, entertains guests with the sights, sounds and tastes of diverse cultural festivities and plenty of Disney magic. Guests can stroll through the Festive Foods Marketplace and enjoy a variety of holiday comfort dishes that span cultures and family traditions. Disney California Adventure Park is located in Anaheim, Calif. (Disneyland Resort)The turkey & stuffing tamale with cranberry relish can be found at the Merry Mashups marketplace during Disney Festival of Holidays at Disney California Adventure Park. The festival, taking place Nov. 9, 2018, through Jan. 8, 2019, entertains guests with the sights, sounds and tastes of diverse cultural festivities and plenty of Disney magic. Guests can stroll through the Festive Foods Marketplace and enjoy a variety of holiday comfort dishes that span cultures and family traditions. Disney California Adventure Park is located in Anaheim, Calif. (Disneyland Resort)

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    When you think of Winnie the Pooh, Tigger, Eeyore, and Piglet it's hard not to get a warm, fuzzy feeling inside. I have vivid memories of that sweet, imaginary place called The Hundred Acre Woods where Pooh and his human friend, Christopher Robin, would play. And eat honey of course. It was the definition of childhood, teaching kids to use their imagination even before those things were emphasized as much as they are now.

    Jim Cummings has been the voice of Winnie the Pooh, Tigger and countless Disney characters for decades. In a sense, he is Pooh. You can't play a character, even as a voice actor, and not start to feel a connection with his words, thoughts and characteristics.

    Now he's bringing Pooh and Tiger to a new generation of kids in Disney's "Christopher Robin." The film stars Ewan McGregor as a grown up Christopher who's lost his imagination and playful spirit. Fortunately, Pooh and the gang haven't forgotten him. So they set out on a mission to find Christopher Robin and help him reconnect to his childhood.

    "Christopher Robin" was just released on Digital and Blu-Ray and to mark the occasion I was invited to interview Cummings about reprising his roles, and what he thinks of this extension of the Winnie the Pooh story.

    I asked him what qualities he shares with this beloved character and he said, "We're both bears of very little brain." he laughed. "But Pooh is a good guy to emulate because he centers you."

    He also tells me he thought McGregor played the perfect Christopher Robin and was relieved he didn't have to reprise that classic pageboy haircut as an adult, fearing it might be a bit cheesy for a modern audience.

    Cummings says he hopes kids around the world will continue to watch and read about the adventures of Pooh and his friends and it will always remind them of a simpler time, innocence and imagination. He tells me those are qualities he's never lost, and hopes he never does.

    "I've been in touch with my inner Pooh, inner Tiger and inner everything my whole life. And if I ever lost touch with it, I'd just go back to The Hundred Acre Wood and everything will be fine."


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    A horse was in need of rescue after apparently becoming stuck in a boulder-filled ditch in Orange County Wednesday.

    Metro Net Fire Authority and Orange City Fire Authority worked together to free the animal in Santiago Oaks Regional Park at 2145 N. Winds Drive.

    The skiddish horse was lead to safety by 2:35 p.m.

    Refresh for updates.


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    A man charged with murder in the death of a Trader Joe's assistant manager killed by a police amid a shootout at the Silver Lake store was to be arraigned Wednesday.

    Gene Evin Atkins is also charged with 50 other counts, including shooting and wounding his grandmother and a 17-year-old girl, and firing at police officers in the July 21 standoff.

    He was charged with murder for Melyda "Mely" Corado's death, even though he did not fire the shot that killed her. He was charged under the theory that he set off the chain of events leading to her death. 

    Police said the 27-year-old assistant manager was struck by a bullet fired by an officer toward Atkins, 28.

    He was accused of leading police on a chase from Hollywood to Silver Lake after allegedly shooting his 76-year-old grandmother, Mary Elizabeth Madison, and a 17-year-old girl around 1:30 p.m. at his grandmother's South Los Angeles home in the 1600 block of East 32nd Street.

    He then allegedly kidnapped the teenager and drove off in his grandmother's 2015 Toyota Camry. Police spotted him in Hollywood, sparking the chase in which Atkins fired shots at pursuing officers through the rear window of the Camry, according to LAPD Chief Michel Moore. A short time later, Atkins crashed into a light pole outside the Trader Joe's in the 2700 block of Hyperion Avenue, leading to the gunfire and standoff at the store.

    Corado was struck by a police bullet when she walked to the front of the store, police said previously.

    Moore said after the shooting that his officers were under fire from Atkins, and he said they did "what they needed to do in order to defend the people of Los Angeles and defend the people in that store and defend themselves." Moore, who apologized to the Corado family after learning she was struck by an officer's bullet, called the shooting "every officer's worst nightmare, to harm an innocent bystander during a violent engagement." Atkins holed up inside the store for about three hours, with dozens of customers and employees still inside the store, before surrendering peacefully.

    The family of Melyda "Mely" Corado filed a lawsuit against the Los Angeles Police Department alleging civil rights violations, battery, excessive force, negligence, infliction of emotional distress, failure to adequately train officers and conspiracy to cover-up wrongful misconduct. It was unclear how much money the family is seeking.

    Attorneys for the Corado family months ago criticized the LAPD for releasing edited dash-cam and body-camera footage of the shooting in what they deemed an orchestrated effort to frame the events leading to her death in support of the officer's actions. They said they want to see the complete, unedited video footage.

    A spokesman for the LAPD said the department does not comment on litigation matters. 



    Photo Credit: AP

    Gene Evin Atkins appears in court for the first time in Los Angeles Superior court in Los Angeles Tuesday, July 24, 2018. Police say Atkins shot his grandmother seven times, kidnapped his 17-year-old girlfriend and shot at officers as they chased his car and then as he ran into the Trader Joe's in the city's Silver Lake section on Saturday afternoon. Police Chief Michel Moore said a store worker, Melyda Corado, was killed by a police officer's bullet as Atkins exchanged gunfire with officers as he ran into the store. Prosecutors say Atkins is being charged with murder under a legal rule that his actions set into motion a series of events leading to Corado being killed. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)Gene Evin Atkins appears in court for the first time in Los Angeles Superior court in Los Angeles Tuesday, July 24, 2018. Police say Atkins shot his grandmother seven times, kidnapped his 17-year-old girlfriend and shot at officers as they chased his car and then as he ran into the Trader Joe's in the city's Silver Lake section on Saturday afternoon. Police Chief Michel Moore said a store worker, Melyda Corado, was killed by a police officer's bullet as Atkins exchanged gunfire with officers as he ran into the store. Prosecutors say Atkins is being charged with murder under a legal rule that his actions set into motion a series of events leading to Corado being killed. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

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