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    A historic summer and fall of wildfires left residents who live near burn areas facing another threat this fall and winter in California. The fires stripped vegetation from hillsides, leaving those ares more succeptible to flooding and debris flows during storms. 

    Use the map below, or this link, to see USGS maps of post-fire debris flow and flood hazard areas affected by wildfires in Southern California. The USGS uses factors live burn severity, soil properties and rainfall forecasts to estimate the probability and size of debris flows.

    Even moderate rainfall can produce flooding in burn areas because they lack the vegetation that would normally absorb water. The fire-scarred hillsides have a repellent layer that blocks water absorption. If it's not absorbed by the soil, rainwater simply washes down the hillside, sometimes with enough force to move boulders, tear out trees and damage buildings and bridges.



    Photo Credit: USGS
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    A USGS map shows wildfire burn areas in October 2018.A USGS map shows wildfire burn areas in October 2018.

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    Rain in the forecast starting Wednesday could aid crews fighting California's deadly wildfires while raising the risk of flash floods and complicating efforts to recover remains of those killed.

    Residents in communities charred by the Los Angeles-area fire stacked sandbags as they prepared for possible downpours that threatened to unleash runoff from hillsides left barren by flames.

    In Northern California, teams continued sifting through ash and debris as they searched for bodies in and around the decimated town of Paradise.

    "The task is arduous," said Rick Crawford with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. "And the possibility exists that some people may never be found."

    With the death toll at 81 in the state's most destructive wildfire, there are still nearly 870 people still unaccounted for.

    Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea said the additional 171 names came from a backlog of voicemails that detectives worked through Tuesday. Authorities had said Monday there were 699 people unaccounted for. 

    Authorities trying to identify the scores of people killed are using rapid DNA testing that produces results in just two hours. The system can analyze DNA from bone fragments or other remains, then match it to genetic material provided by relatives of the missing. But the technology depends on people coming forward to give a DNA sample via a cheek swab, and so far, there are not nearly as many volunteers as authorities had hoped for.

    As of Tuesday, nearly two weeks after the inferno, only about 60 people had provided samples to pop-up labs, said Annette Mattern, a spokeswoman for ANDE, the Longmont, Colorado, company that is donating the technology.

    "We need hundreds," Mattern said. "We need a big enough sample for us to make a positive ID on these and to also give a better idea of how many losses there actually are."

    The burned area surrounding Paradise, which is about 140 miles (225.3 kilometers) northwest of San Francisco, will see rain starting Wednesday. The precipitation could help knock out the flames, but it could also hinder the search by washing away fragmentary remains and turning ash into a thick paste.

    The National Weather Service issued a flash flood watch for Paradise and nearby communities and for those areas charred by wildfires earlier this year in Lake, Shasta, Trinity and Mendocino counties.

    The Camp Fire, which has burned an area about the size of the city of Chicago — nearly 238 square miles (616 square kilometers) — and destroyed around 13,000 homes, was 75 percent contained on Tuesday.

    In Southern California, people who worried days earlier that their homes might be consumed by flames were now taking action to guard against possible debris flows caused by the Pacific storm set to come ashore the day before Thanksgiving. Residents filling sandbags at Malibu's famous Zuma Beach were mindful of the disaster that struck less than a year ago when a downpour on a fresh burn scar up the coast sent home-smashing debris flows through Montecito, killing 21 people and leaving two missing.

    The 151-square-mile (391-square-kilometer) Woolsey Fire was almost entirely contained, with 1,500 buildings destroyed and 341 damaged. The major remaining closed area was centered in the rugged Santa Monica Mountains that rise high above the Malibu coast.

    Associated Press journalists Christopher Weber and John Antczak contributed to this report.



    Photo Credit: Sudhin Thanawala/AP

    In this Nov. 18, 2018 file photo, volunteer members of an El Dorado County search and rescue team search the ruins of a home, looking for human remains, in Paradise, Calif., following a wildfire.In this Nov. 18, 2018 file photo, volunteer members of an El Dorado County search and rescue team search the ruins of a home, looking for human remains, in Paradise, Calif., following a wildfire.

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    Dozens of cranes are swinging through the sky in downtown, only outnumbered by the hardhats of construction workers, busy putting up yet another mega apartment building. LA's historic skyline is literally changing before our eyes.

    "You'd have to go back to the mid-1920s to find a period of construction similar to what we are seeing downtown," Steve Basham, CoStar senior market analyst, said.

    A new report from the rental website Zumper says this month, Los Angeles ranked as the second most expensive city for renters in the LA-metro area, just behind Santa Monica. The average one bedroom apartment is now up to $2,430, and there's no shortage of availability.

    In fact, an explosion of new development in downtown Los Angeles means there are more empty apartments than ever before.

    So while the new buildings are becoming more luxurious, the deals for renters are getting better and better.

    CoStar is a company that tracks new construction.  Basham says the vacancy rate of apartments in downtown LA is currently 10.6 percent. That's as high as it's ever been.

    "The perception of the area has really shifted, and the opening of these apartment communities is a big part of that," Basham said.

    The 825 South Hill, a luxury apartment building, is set to open next year. When it's done, it's expected to be the tallest apartment building in Los Angeles.

    At 53 stories tall, it will add yet another 500 apartments to the downtown area. And they are pretty fancy.

    A two-bedroom, two-bath is about 990 square feet. It features hidden appliances, making it feel very spacious.

    It goes for $3,000 to $4,000 a month, depending on which floor you're on. Every unit has a balcony and a view.

    But in order to fill these towers, developers are now going extreme.

    The Sofia building will offer a free gym membership that includes yoga and spin classes. There's even a karaoke room. And - drum roll - up to six weeks free rent.

    In another building called Topaz, the deal is even better. They offer eight weeks free rent on some leases, which could save more than $4,000. There's also free parking, a resort pool, and a washer and dryer in the apartment.

    A spokesman for the apartment says there are various types of people who live in the area, but they expect the type to go for the luxury downtown apartment would be a career couple who would entertain more and more at home, "as downtown continues to mature."

    CoStar says more than 10,000 units have opened in downtown since 2014. There are another 4,300 under construction.



      Photo Credit: KNBC-TV

      Dozens of cranes are swinging through the sky in downtown, only outnumbered by the hardhats of construction workers, busy putting up yet another mega apartment building. LA's historic skyline is literally changing before our eyes.Dozens of cranes are swinging through the sky in downtown, only outnumbered by the hardhats of construction workers, busy putting up yet another mega apartment building. LA's historic skyline is literally changing before our eyes.

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      World Against Toys Causing Harm, also known as WATCH, released the 2018 top 10 list of worst toys for this holiday season. From choking hazards to potential facial injuries, the non-profit organization discusses why these toys are better off on children's wish lists and not in their hands.

      Photo Credit: World Against Toys Causing Harm

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      Pay close attention while prepping your turkey and exercise extreme care when setting up your holiday decorations. Statistically, you'll be playing with fire.

      There are more in-home fires during the holiday season than at any other time of the year, according to data from the National Fire Protection Association. Thanksgiving is the single worst day for fires, NBC News reported.

      An estimated 2,090 home fires were reported to fire departments around the United States on Thanksgiving 2016, according to the association. That’s more than twice the daily average for the rest of the year. Of the Thanksgiving fires, three-quarters were cooking-related. On average, Thanksgiving fires killed five people, injured 25 and caused $19 million in property loss from 2014 to 2016, according to the U.S. Fire Administration. 

      Distractions are the main cause of cooking fires, according to the NFPA, adding that hosts are inclined to talk to guests instead of managing the kitchen at all times. To stay safe during the holidays, experts suggest keeping combustible items like aprons and towels away from flames, installing or checking smoke and carbon monoxide detectors and paying attention while cooking.



      Photo Credit: Getty Images

      Be careful when making Thanksgiving dinner this year.Be careful when making Thanksgiving dinner this year.

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      Big Balloons, colorful floats and famous stars will fill the streets of New York City Thursday for the 92nd annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.

      Hosted on the national holiday by Savannah Guthrie, Hoda Kotb and Al Roker, the three-hour event will air at 9 a.m. in all time zones. An encore presentation will air at 2 p.m.

      Watch the parade live online Thursday by clicking here and logging in with your TV provider.

      Special musical guests are expected to include Barenaked Ladies, John Legend, Leona Lewis, Martina McBride, Rita Ora, Pentatonix, the cast and Muppets of "Sesame Street" and Diana Ross and her family.

      Also watch for an expected performance by the Radio City Rockettes, as well as appearances from beloved balloons including Charlie Brown, Olaf, the Pillsbury Doughboy and the Elf on the Shelf.



      Photo Credit: Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images, File

      This Nov. 23, 2017, file photo shows the 91st annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City.This Nov. 23, 2017, file photo shows the 91st annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City.

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      Bread never seems to show its weariness with we humans, though our affection for bread-based puns is ever on the rise.

      No amount of dough can stop a punster from buttering up a listener with all manner of corny punnery, and, any way you slice it, bread will forever be our favorite topic when we're just loafing around.

      But to say that November is the month when our carb-luscious, tum-filling favorite is, well, truly on the rise requires no punning about at all: It's the truth. For a lot of bakeries are looking to Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, and Christmas for inspiration to flour.

      Er, flower.

      So many great breads are now baking around town, but check out a trio of temptations as we, um, toast the most grateful day of the year.

      Milk Bar... has a croissant stuffed with all manner of Thanksgiving-y goodness, including tart cranberries. If you ever wondered if a croissant could stand in for the bread in a turkey sandwich, and make the whole shebang sing, wonder no longer: It can, and it is available now, under the easy-to-remember name Thanksgiving Croissant.

      La Brea Bakery... is, as is tasty tradition, baking up a whole slice-ready slew of breads that are both traditional and perfect for holiday get-togethers. And from that last category? A tried-and-true "fan favorite" has recently returned, just in time for the season: Hello White Chocolate Cranberry Loaf. 

      Pitchoun!... has cleverly fashioned a croissant that's also a churro. Or is it a churro that's also a croissant? Either way, expect flake-a-tude, expect layers of delicious doughness, and vanilla custard cream, too (as well as sprinkled cinnamon sugar to top it all off). Order up, through November, for the Churro Croissant.

      Are we bun, er, done singing the praises of bread?

      Never, but we'll pause here, so holiday bread buffs can get out there, and get snacking, before these seasonal treats are as gone as a particularly tempting heel, the one that's all crust.



      Photo Credit: Milk Bar/La Brea Bakery/Pitchoun!

      Try some tasty seasonal breads at Milk Bar, La Brea Bakery, and Pitchoun!Try some tasty seasonal breads at Milk Bar, La Brea Bakery, and Pitchoun!

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      A 23-year-old Florida woman was captured on police body camera video dropping a baby on its head, fracturing the infant's skull, while running away from police.

      Kayla Morgan was arrested Monday and charged with aggravated child abuse and resisting arrest. 

      Marion County sheriff’s deputies were called after witnesses reported seeing a woman darting in and out of traffic near Silver Springs while holding an infant, according to NBC affiliate WESH-TV.

      When deputies approached Morgan, she could be seen running away before dropping the infant head first on the ground. Video shows a bystander rushing to help the child and handing the baby over to officers.  

      The baby was taken to the hospital with a fractured skull, deputies said. It was not immeditaley clear if Morgan was the baby's mother. Officials said the baby is expected to recover. 

      Morgan was taken to an area hospital after telling deputies she had been taking psychoactive drugs, including methamphetamine and the street drug "Molly," over the last three days.

      She told investigators she thought "a monster was trying to suck her blood," according to WESH.

      It was not immediately clear if Morgan had an attorney.



      Photo Credit: Marion County Sheriff's Office

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      The historic Bob Baker Marionette Theater, the longtime home of the celebrated puppeteer's celebrated stringful creations, sits just under 11 miles from the Pasadena Playhouse.

      Why would this be a distance to note? Because the historic venue, which sits just northwest of DTLA, recently shuttered after well over a half century of pleasing kids, parents, and puppet-loving people with a host of vibrant, kind-hearted shows.

      But the marionettes aren't going away, and as they're the soul of Mr. Baker's vision, that means everything.

      And the Pasadena Playhouse meaning earlier? Get gleeful, lovers of old-school holiday pageantry: The Bob Baker Marionettes will be alighting at the Crown City theater for a solid run of seasonal entertainment.

      Bob Baker's "Nutcracker" will open on Saturday, Nov. 24 at the location, and then settle in for a month-plus run, ending on Dec. 31.

      Wait, "settle in" isn't correct at all. The marionettes will frolic, gambol, prance, jump, and spin, taking on the classic ballet tale in their inimitable, marionette-merry style.

      Waltzing Flowers? The Sugarplum Fairy? They'll be there, as well as other tantalizing plot points, like the Mysterious Door, and what might be just on the other side.

      A ticket is $20, and free for children ages 2 and under.

      The Pasadena Playhouse may, as mentioned, sit just under 11 miles from the Bob Baker Marionette Theater, but, in spirit, they'll be very close, making for one happy holiday happening for both longtime fans and those future fans who've never seen a marionette show before.

      And, by the by, if you were in the audience for the very first Bob Baker "Nutcracker" production, you were there in 1969.

      That's quite the light-of-spirit legacy, and one to be treasured, especially during the time of year when we especially treasure our nostalgic entertainment traditions.



      Photo Credit: Bob Baker Marionette Theater

      Bob Baker's sweet Bob Baker's sweet "Nutcracker" finds a new home at the Pasadena Playhouse. The cute figures shall frolic from Nov. 24 through Dec. 30, 2018,

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    • 11/21/18--10:24: Pet of the Week: Blue

    •  

      Find someone who looks at you like Blue -- or just find Blue. He's a 1-year-old pit bull mix who has been waiting for his best friends at the Agoura Animal Care Center.

       

      • ID: A5219092
      • Phone: (818) 483-4228

       

      Blue was turned in by his previous owner and immediately stole the hearts of volunteers and staff members. He's engaging and just loves to be around humans, especially humans with treats. Give Blue a "sit" and "paw" command and he knows exactly how to please.

      Blue has an enlarged heart, which means he fatigues quickly, but he's fine with short and leisurely walks. He would do well with a family looking for a medium-energy dog who likes to cuddle. 

      Blue is housebroken, walks well on a leash and is always up for a car ride.



      Photo Credit: Jonathan Lloyd/KNBC-TV

      This is Blue, a 1-year-old pit bull mix who is looking for a home.This is Blue, a 1-year-old pit bull mix who is looking for a home.

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      Ray Chavez, the oldest veteran survivor of the Attack on Pearl Harbor, has died, his loved ones confirmed.

      Chavez died overnight, peacefully in his sleep, his cousin told NBC 7. He was 106 years old. Until his death, the Poway resident had been the oldest living veteran survivor of Pearl Harbor.

      Last March, the veteran celebrated his 105th birthday with a solid workout at his gym. A couple days later, a big party was held for him on the flight deck aboard the USS Midway.

      At that time, Chavez told NBC 7 he had hit the gym on his birthday so he could feel like he had earned himself a piece of cake. Even at 105, he was quick-witted, charismatic and humble.

      Chavez served missions on a minesweeper and attack transport ship 77 years ago and responded to Pearl Harbor on the morning of Dec. 7, 1941.

      Over the past few years, the veteran often answered questions posed by the media about how he had made it through such a long life so happy and healthy.

      "Obey the laws, for one thing," Chavez once said, sternly.

      He also said making friends was high on his list.

      On his last birthday, he said his wish for the coming year was this: “Whatever good comes along, I wish everybody would share it.”

      Chavez was also asked about what had been the best piece of life advice he had ever received.

      “To get as much education as you can and also to be kind to all people, especially the elderly and the less fortunate. That’s what I remember most,” he said.

      That advice came from his parents.

      Chavez recalled being called to active duty as one of the most important memories of his life.

      “War. Being in right in the middle of it,” Chavez said. “It was quite a surprise. I saw everything. Smoke and fire.”

      As the oldest living veteran of the attack, Chavez flew to Honolulu to celebrate the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor in December 2016. He was accompanied by his daughter, a U.S. Navy veteran, and escorted by San Diego firefighter Mitch Mendler and retired New York firefighter Joe Torillo, a survivor of the 9/11 attacks.

      In July 2015, Chavez reunited with Jim Downing, 102, in San Diego more than 74 years after they served together in the military. Together, the duo reflected on their unbreakable bond.



      Photo Credit: NBC 7 San Diego

      Ray Chavez in December 2016 -- when he was 104 years old.Ray Chavez in December 2016 -- when he was 104 years old.

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      The countdown in on to Thanksgiving, so we've assembled a list of all the food recalls to keep in mind as you prepare for the holiday meal. It's one of the stories we're featuring today on NBCLA.com.

      All the Food Recalls Ahead of Thanksgiving

      Just in time for the holiday season, a full serving of food recalls. Here's what to know about what's in the kitchen.

      From the Golden State to the Red Planet

      After six months and 300 million miles, a spacecraft launched from the Golden State will land Monday on the Red Planet. Here's why flight controllers are both nervous and excited.

      Growing Concerns About 'Toxic Rain and Ash' From Woolsey Fire

      There are new concerns among people living near the mostly-contained Woolsey Fire: rains predicted for Thursday night could wash tons of potentially toxic ash down from the charred Santa Susana Field Lab toward homes in bordering neighborhoods and into a popular children's camp. Read the report.

      After the Turkey: Post-Thanksgiving Events in LA

      If you're still up for it, The Scene has some things to do after Thanksgiving. From a Three Stooges celebration to ice skating, you'll find something to keep you busy over the holiday weekend.



      Photo Credit: Getty Images

      Thanksgiving Roast Turkey DinnerThanksgiving Roast Turkey Dinner

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      It had been 10 days since the Greenbergs evacuated their Malibu Park house, endured six hours in the mass exodus traffic jam on Pacific Coast Highway, and settled in with accommodating Woodland Hills friends to wait out Woolsey, the most destructive fire ever in their world-renowned seaside community.

      Finally, they returned over the Santa Monica Mountains through Malibu Canyon, stopping in the civic center at the newly-opened Assistance Center before making their way upcoast, already knowing their home of three decades had been consumed.

      "I'm kind of afraid to go back to our neighborhood," admitted Tony Greenberg, MD, sitting with his wife, Jill, who runs the Malibu Learning Center tutoring program located on their property.

      As they spoke with a reporter outside the assistance center, they encountered friends and neighbors who had also suffered losses. But without missing a beat, Dr. Greenberg added a pledge.

      "I believe we have to rebuild our neighborhood."

      It is a recurring theme your hear from most everyone returning to Malibu, haven for artists and creators, its scenic beauty of mountains meeting ocean again scarred by wildfire, the full extent of it still yet to be fully assessed, but perhaps as many as 600 homes destroyed.

      "Nobody ever though it would be of this magnitude," said Karen York, longtime publisher of the Malibu Times newspaper.

      A quarter century ago, she and her husband had lost their La Costa neighborhood home during what until Woolsey had been Malibu's worst ever conflagration, the Old Topanga fire that destroyed much of the city's eastern end.

      Woolsey burned father west, the brunt of it inflicted on Malibu's upcoast end, beyond the civic center all the way into Ventura County.

      The city of Malibu, comprising more than 20 miles of coastline and extending only a few miles inland, is home to 13,000 residents, with thousands of summer visitors. Also considered within the Malibu community are many more who live in the unincorporated area in the mountains above.

      York already looks ahead to Malibu's recovery.

      "That's really important to rebuild as fast as we can," York said.

      Many in Malibu use the word "magical" to describe the appeal.

      "Malibu is a special place," said the Greenbergs, who spoke of not only the beauty and the climate, but the community connection. 

      "We didn't realize how important that was till this happened to us," Jill Greenberg said. 

      "We don't stop. We put our heads down and keep walking," declared one well-known Malibu resident still visibly in physical pain.

      Jefferson "Zuma Jay" Wagner, the stuntman, surfshop owner, and incoming Malibu mayor came to the assistance center having been been only recently released  from being hospitalized for burns and other injuries suffered trying to save his house from the Woolsey fire.

      Like so many in his community, Wagner is already giving thought to what needs to be done differently this time when Malibu rises again from ashes.

      From his experience, Wagner sees need for more more rigorous roofing standards. It was not the wall of flames that overwhelmed his house in the hills, he said, but windblown embers that ignited the roof.

      Standards should be focused on area needs and adopted locally, not imposed from Sacramento, in the view of State Senator Henry Stern, D-Malibu, whose Malibu condominium home burned in the fire.

      The Greenbergs will be disappointed if incorporating greater fire resistance deprives homes of charm.

      "I hope I don't have to build a concrete bunker," said Jill Greenberg.

      She emphasized she and her husband want to stay in Malibu Park, but at the same time, said insurance provisions mean many residents have no choice. If the Greenbergs keep their home in California, their policy limits reimbursement to rebuilding their existing property, not using the proceeds to buy another house, unless they move out of state.

      Another area of concern is water delivery systems that  could not meet demand  Nov. 9 when the fire came across the mountains and down to the coast at Point Dume.  Many residents who stayed behind to try to protect their homes said water pressure dropped to a trickle.

      Council member Lou La Monte urges a new look at the long delayed plan to upgrade Malibu's Waterworks District 29.

      There have disagreements over the scope of the project, in part stemming from resistance among many community members to infrastructure improvements that would enable unwanted development and growth.

      Given Malibu's location below brush covered canyons prone to seasonal Santa Ana Winds, periodic wildfires have always come with the territory, since before the current drought, before recognition of climate change, even before Malibu was discovered by movie stars and moguls, and the Malibu Colony developed as Hollywood's seaside playground.

      Looking from the outside, what some forget, La Monte and others remind, is that Malibu is home to thousands who are neither famous nor rich, many first lured up coast decades ago when it was a less expensive alternative to coastal living than Santa Monica.

      "This community will always be vulnerable," La Monte said.

      But for those who savor what it can be again, "the tradeoff is generally worth it."

      And there is even a sense of gratitude that, as horrific as was the Woolsey fire, it was orders of magnitude less severe than what, in the Sierra foothills 400 miles to the north, the Camp Fire inflicted on Paradise.



      Photo Credit: AP

      A home stands alone, at left, among the devastation left behind by a wildfire Monday, Nov. 12, 2018, in Malibu, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)A home stands alone, at left, among the devastation left behind by a wildfire Monday, Nov. 12, 2018, in Malibu, Calif. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)

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      It’s time to give thanks — for hats, heavy coats and central heating.

      Millions of Americans in the Northeast and Middle Atlantic states will wake up to the coldest Thanksgiving in more than a century, with high winds even threatening the iconic Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, meteorologists said Wednesday.

      The mercury in Philadelphia is expected to dip to a bone-chilling 29-degree high on Thursday, with similar shivering temperatures also set for New York and Boston at 26 and 21 degrees, respectively, according to NBC meteorologist Kathryn Prociv. The coldest Thanksgiving days in those cities happened in 1901, 1871 and 1873, respectively.

      New York City is also bracing for winds between 15 mph and 25 mph on Thursday. Any sustained winds of 23 mph or gusts of 34 mph would ground the massive inflatable balloons of the parade, organizers said. The decision will be made Thursday morning whether those balloons will be in action.



      Photo Credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images

      This Jan. 2, 2018, file photo shows a person walking in Chicago, IllinoisThis Jan. 2, 2018, file photo shows a person walking in Chicago, Illinois

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      An explosion and fire damaged a house in the Reseda area Wednesday and left three hurt.

      "Boom! Then, half a minute later, boom, boom!" Igor Krakovsky said, describing the explosion. He had a dashcam recording when the explosion started, and fire ignited.

      Firefighters responded to the home in the 7700 block of North Aura Avenue at 9:10 a.m. They managed to knock down the flames in about 20 minutes, the Los Angeles Fire Department said.

      Krakovsky ran toward the home to see if he could help. A woman staggered out before the fire began, with a dog on a leash, he said.

      Two people suffered critical burns in the blaze.

      Arson investigators said the home was a suspected drug lab, built for extracting oil from marijuana. 



      Photo Credit: Igor Krakovsky

      Dashcam captured the incredible moment a house exploded in Reseda Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2018.Dashcam captured the incredible moment a house exploded in Reseda Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2018.

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      Ray Chavez, the oldest veteran survivor of the attack on Pearl Harbor, has died, his loved ones confirmed.

      Chavez died overnight, peacefully in his sleep, his cousin told NBC 7. He was 106. 

      Last March, the Poway resident celebrated his 105th birthday with a solid workout at his gym. A couple of days later, a big party was held for him on the flight deck aboard the USS Midway.

      At that time, Chavez told NBC 7 he had hit the gym on his birthday so he could feel like he had earned himself a piece of cake. Even at 105, he was quick-witted, charismatic and humble.

      Chavez served missions on a minesweeper and attack transport ship 77 years ago and responded to Pearl Harbor on the morning of Dec. 7, 1941.

      Over the past few years, the veteran often answered questions posed by reporters about how he had made it through such a long life so happy and healthy.

      "Obey the laws, for one thing," Chavez once said, sternly.

      He also said making friends was high on his list.

      On his last birthday, he said his wish for the coming year was this: “Whatever good comes along, I wish everybody would share it.”

      Chavez was also asked about what had been the best piece of life advice he had ever received.

      “To get as much education as you can and also to be kind to all people, especially the elderly and the less fortunate. That’s what I remember most,” he said.

      That advice came from his parents.

      Chavez recalled being called to active duty as one of the most important memories of his life.

      “War. Being in right in the middle of it,” Chavez said. “It was quite a surprise. I saw everything. Smoke and fire.”

      As the oldest living veteran of the attack, Chavez flew to Honolulu to celebrate the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor in December 2016. He was accompanied by his daughter, U.S. Navy veteran Kathleen Chavez, and escorted by San Diego firefighter Mitch Mendler and retired New York firefighter Joe Torillo, a survivor of the 9/11 attacks.

      In July 2015, Chavez reunited with Jim Downing, 102, in San Diego more than 74 years after they served together in the military. Together, the duo reflected on their unbreakable bond.

      On Wednesday, NBC 7 spoke with Chavez's daughter at the family's home in Poway, where they have lived since 1961. Kathleen said her father was an avid gardener who loved tending to rose bushes and trees on his property.

      She said Chavez had not wanted to reflect on his WWII experience until recently because, really, he was a bit shy. Kathleen is grateful, however, that Chavez was able to share his story in recent years.

      In her father's memory, Kathleen plans to go to Hawaii for an upcoming Pearl Harbor memorial.

      She said a date for Chavez's funeral has not been set.



      Photo Credit: NBC 7 San Diego

      Ray Chavez in December 2016 -- when he was 104 years old.Ray Chavez in December 2016 -- when he was 104 years old.

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      "I'm going to The Pie Hole to eat a Pie hole" might suggest, to a listener, that you end to devour the whole pie shop, including the door, the tables, and the ovens, too.

      But The Pie Hole and a Pie hole are two different things, though, yes, as of earlier in November, they are now deliciously linked in many a pie person's mind.

      For "The Pie Hole" is, yes, a Southern California boutique pastry chain of pie-luscious shops while a "Pie hole," with a lowercase "h," is a new "two-bite" pie served within those pie-luscious shops.

      Mmm, two-bite pies. When one bite is not enough, and, really, one slice or whole pie isn't enough, but you only should probably have two bites, for the moment.

      And, of course, if you buy two two-bite pies, well, here's the delicious math: You'll get four bites.

      Pie holes are a buck each, while a Baker's Dozen is $12. 

      The flavors? There are four, including Mexican chocolate, Nutella, caramel apple, and blueberry crumble.

      The places to pie it up? The Pie Hole has taken hold in several area neighborhoods, including the Arts District, Long Beach, Pasadena, Hollywood, Orange County, and Venice.

      The number of two-bite Pie holes that would ultimately equal one whole pie? That might be a question for a philosopher to ponder. Because how many bites would it take you to inhale an entire pie?

      A chin-scratcher, indeed. Best start out with these new two-biters, for a buck a pop, and go from there. Spend four bucks, get all four different Pi holes, and have the sublime experience of eating a quartet of pie flavors in one sitting.

      That's a hole, we mean whole new experience, even for the hardcore pie-eating pros out there.



      Photo Credit: The Pie Hole

      Smaller pie Smaller pie "bites," with yummy fillings, are now available for a buck each, at The Pie Hole.

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      A multiple vehicle crash in Redondo Beach left four cars mangled and eight people hurt Wednesday as authorities asked drivers to avoid the area.

      The crash occurred at Pacific Coast Highway and Torrance Boulevard around 3:30 p.m.

      A vehicle heading west on Torrance Boulevard didn't stop at a red light, leading to a chain reaction crash. In all, six vehicles were involved. 

      Eight people were taken to the hospital, but the severity of their injuries was not clear. 

      PCH was closed in both directions at the intersection. 



      Photo Credit: KNBC-TV

      A crash on Pacific Coast Highway at Torrance Boulevard left four cars totaled Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2018.A crash on Pacific Coast Highway at Torrance Boulevard left four cars totaled Wednesday, Nov. 21, 2018.

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      Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev wanted to plead guilty and help the prosecution in exchange for life imprisonment, court documents unsealed Wednesday reveal.

      But prosecutors did not make a deal, and Tsarnaev was convicted at trial and sentenced to death for the 2013 bombing, which killed three people and injured hundreds.

      According to a document released Wednesday, Tsarnaev "offered to provide certain kinds of cooperation and assistance, in the course of plea negotiations."

      But the filing then says, "The government has consistently rejected Tsarnaev's conditional offers" NBC News reported.



      Photo Credit: Boston Globe via Getty Images

      An artist's sketch of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev hangs on the wall outside the Moakley courthouse for videographers to record during the Marathon bombing trial.An artist's sketch of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev hangs on the wall outside the Moakley courthouse for videographers to record during the Marathon bombing trial.

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      A 17-year-old was arrested Wednesday after a woman and her teenage sister were found slain in their Westchester area apartment that was set on fire, the Los Angeles Police Department said. 

      The sisters, Uniek Atkins, 27, and Sierra Brown, 16, were found dead in their apartment at 8655 South Belford Ave. Nov. 17.

      Both of the victims were shot, the LAPD said. 

      The unidentified teen, who was a boyfriend to one of the victims, was arrested on suspicion of murder Wednesday in the 1900 block of 22nd Street. Police would not say who he was in a relationship with at the time of the crime. 

      Another minor was arrested in connection with the crime. He was arrested on suspicion of being an accessory to homicide, LAPD said. 

      Police said the slaying was a domestic violence incident. 

      Family members held a vigil for the victims Sunday. 

      Anyone with information on the crime was urged to call 877-LAPD-247.

      If you would like to donate to a GoFundMe account set up for Uniek Atkins and Sierra Brown, you may do so here. Note that GoFundMe deducts 2.9 percent of all funds raised, plus 30 cents per donation, in the form of payment processing charges.



      Photo Credit: KNBC-TV

      Mourners gather to remember Uniek Atkins, 27, and her sister Sierra Brown, 16, on Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2018. Both sisters were found shot to death after firefighters put out a blaze in their apartment on Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018.Mourners gather to remember Uniek Atkins, 27, and her sister Sierra Brown, 16, on Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2018. Both sisters were found shot to death after firefighters put out a blaze in their apartment on Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018.

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