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    President Donald Trump continued to berate journalists on Friday, zeroing in on two black women with comments that drew a letter of condemnation from the National Association of Black Journalists.

    When Abby D. Phillip of CNN asked whether Trump wanted acting Attorney General Matt Whitaker to rein in special counsel Robert Mueller, he responded: “What a stupid question that is. What a stupid question. But I watch you a lot. You ask a lot of stupid questions.”

    Mueller is investigating whether there was collusion between Trump’s campaign and Russia during the 2016 election — a probe Trump has decried as a witch hunt and which the new acting attorney general criticized before his appointment. Trump did not answer Phillip’s question.

    Of April Ryan of American Urban Radio Networks, one of his most frequent targets, Trump said: “You talk about somebody that’s a loser; she doesn’t know what the hell she’s doing. She gets publicity and then she gets a pay raise or she gets a contract with, I think, CNN. But she’s very nasty. And she shouldn’t be. She shouldn’t be. You’ve got to treat the White House and the office of the presidency with respect.”

    Earlier in the week, he tried to cut off Yamiche Alcindor of PBS NewsHour as she asked about his use of the word “nationalist” to describe himself and whether that empowered white nationalists.

    “I don’t know why you would say that. That’s such a racist question,” he said while she continued to ask whether the Republican party was now seen as racist because of his rhetoric.

    “I don’t believe that,” he said, as he juxtaposed “nationalist” with “globalist.” “I don’t believe that. I don’t believe that. Why do I have my highest poll numbers ever with African Americans. Why do I have among the highest poll numbers with African Americans. That’s such a racist question…Excuse me, but to say that, what you said, is so insulting to me. It’s a very terrible thing that you said.”

    Trump has a history of denigrating black people and denigrating women so it is no surprise that he would dial up the animosity for black women, said Sherri Williams, an assistant professor of race, media and communication at American University. Trump’s disdain shows that they are doing their job, as they question him not only about race, which he is particularly sensitive about, but also about how his administration is operating, she said.

    “They’re challenging the powerful and they’re demanding truth and they’re resisting this lack of transparency,” she said.

    He will face more of the same when the newly elected women take their seats in the House of Representatives next year, she said.

    “The kinds of questions that he is facing from these black women reporters are the kinds of challenges that he is going to have to face from legislators in the coming months, so he might as well get used to it,” Williams said.

    Trump’s latest attacks followed his party’s loss of control of the House. Recounts and runoffs loom in other races Republicans are anxious to win in Florida, where results in the governor’s and Senate races have narrowed, and in Georgia, where former state Rep. Stacey Abrams, another black woman, has refused to concede the governor's race to former Secretary of State Brian Kemp. With ballots still being counted, Trump and other Republicans started making unsubstantiated charges of voter fraud.

    During the campaign, Trump said Abrams, a graduate of Yale Law School and the minority leader in the Georgia State House of Representatives, was “not qualified” for the job.

    According to the Center for American Women in Politics at Rutgers University, at least 102 women will serve in the U.S. House, and at least 43 women of color — 42 of them Democrats and one Republican. Another nine women, six Democrats and three Republicans, will serve as governors. Abrams, if she wins, would be the first black woman governor.

    Adding to his difficulties with women on Friday, The Wall Street Journal published an account of what it said was Trump’s direct intervention to suppress stories about alleged sexual encounters with women. The article said interviews refuted denials from Trump and others that he was involved in payoffs to a former Playboy model, Karen McDougal, and a former adult-firm actress, Stephanie Clifford, known professionally as Stormy Daniels. Trump has denied any sexual relationship with the women.

    Trump has made some famously misogynistic comments, including one about “grabbing” women he was attracted to, and he has repeatedly denigrated black people, from Democratic Rep. Maxine Waters of California, whom he has mocked as “an extraordinarily low IQ person,” to NBA superstar LeBron James (and CNN journalist Don Lemon) about whom Trump tweeted: “LeBron James was just interviewed by the dumbest man on television, Don Lemon. He made Lebron look smart, which isn’t easy to do.” He called former White House official, Omarosa Manigault Newman, “that dog” and a “crazy, crying lowlife” after she accused him of racism.

    The use of the word “dog” is “wonderfully dehumanizing, which is part of what I think he’s doing,” said Linda-Susan Beard, an associate professor of English and director of Africana Studies at Bryn Mawr College. “He’s undercutting the professionalism of these individuals. He’s suggesting that no black person in America of either gender is intellectually respectable.”

    In a statement from the National Association of Black Journalists, the group’s president, Sarah Glover, who also is the social media editor for NBC Owned Television Stations, said, "The most powerful man in the free world is verbally abusing journalists. The past two years have been filled with assaults on the media and Donald Trump's comments this week have reached an all-time low with attacks on three black female journalists. His dismissive comments toward journalists April Ryan, Abby Phillip and Yamiche Alcindor are appalling, irresponsible, and should be denounced."

    The association, which noted that Phillip is a former Washington Post reporter and a graduate of Harvard University, called on the president to stop his verbal assault not only on black women journalists but on all journalists.

    The White House press office did not respond immediately when asked in an email if the president was singling out black women for criticism.

    This week the White House suspended CNN’s Jim Acosta’s credentials, accusing him of “placing his hands on a young woman just trying to do her job as a White House intern.”

    Video of the press conference on Wednesday does not appear to back up that claim. Acosta was engaged in a tense exchange with the president during a press conference on Wednesday when his arm seems to have brushed against the intern’s as she repeatedly tried to grab the microphone from him. Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders later released video meant to back the White House’s version of events, but which was widely dismissed as doctored.

    Even as journalists condemned the action against Acosta, Trump on Friday threatened other reporters’ press passes if they did not treat the White House with respect.



    Photo Credit: AP, Getty

    Journalists Abby Phillip (L), Yamiche Alcindor (C) and April Ryan (R)Journalists Abby Phillip (L), Yamiche Alcindor (C) and April Ryan (R)

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    The United States will soon suspend its mission to re-fuel Saudi Arabia’s military aircraft flying in Yemen, according to two U.S. officials and one Senate staffer.

    Saudi Arabia is expected to announce it no longer needs U.S. tankers for the mission, placing the decision for the change on Riyadh rather than Washington, NBC News reported.

    A Senate staffer said the decision is a means to pre-empt a potentially damaging debate and vote in Congress. 



    Photo Credit: AP

    President Donald Trump meets with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the Oval Office of the White House, Tuesday, March 20, 2018, in Washington.President Donald Trump meets with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the Oval Office of the White House, Tuesday, March 20, 2018, in Washington.

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    This map displays fire information collected by CAL FIRE, the state firefighting agency. Click on each location for more information, including containment figures and the size of the fire.

    California is facing another fall season of high-risk fire danger. Click on the map to see where fires are burning. 



    Photo Credit: Cal Fire
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    A look at where fires are burning Friday Nov. 9, 2018 in California.A look at where fires are burning Friday Nov. 9, 2018 in California.

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    Powered by Santa Ana winds and dry air, a 35,000-acre brush fire made a destructive, two-county march toward the sea Friday, indiscriminately consuming multimillion-dollar mansions and mobile homes alike as it forced a citywide Malibu evacuation and sent thousands of residents scrambling to find a way out of the burn area.

    The Woolsey fire forced evacuations in communities northwest of Los Angeles after it began Thursday afternoon amid warm, dry and windy conditions. The fire is threatening tens of thousands of homes Friday as strong winds cast embers that ignited smaller spot fires and pushed the fire across the 101 Freeway in the Agoura Hills area.

    Acting Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a state of emergency Friday due to the destructive Woolsey Fire and nearby Hill Fire. A state of emergency was declared Thursday for the monster Camp Fire in Northern California.

    Evacuations were ordered Friday morning for parts of Malibu south of the 101 Freeway. By late Friday, evacuations had been expanded by the Simi Valley Police Department.

    "The wind-whipped conditions ... this is ripe conditions for explosive fire behavior," said LAFD Capt. Erik Scott. "This is the new normal. When we have conditions like this, when it's such incredible wind, that brings us in to a different caliber, so it's become a much more challenging condition."

    A Los Angeles County Fire Department battalion chief told NBC4 the flames could burn "for days."

    Late Friday morning, the Woolsey fire burned 35,000 acres, was zero percent contained and damaged multiple structures. Los Angeles County Deputy Fire Chief Dave Richardson said 45,000 people in Ventura County and 43,000 more in Los Angeles County were ordered to evacuate overnight.

    The number grew to 200,000 by late Friday afternoon. 

    Many homes have been destroyed, but firefighters did not have a firm number Friday morning as wind continued to push flames toward the south.

    "The winds haven't died down, and that's unfortunate," said NBC4 forecaster Shanna Mendiola. "Winds are gusting anywhere between 40 to 50 mph, strong enough to carry theses embers. We do expect these winds to die down, but not completely go away."

    Dominic Oliveri fled from his home in the Decker Canyon area with his wife. They were stopped along Mulholland Hwy near Little Sycamore Canyon Road.

    "We waited as long as we could and the flames were coming down the hill opposite of us, and we just aid we had to go," he said. "I've been here 40 years, and I've seen it all," This is the first time I had to leave my house ever.

    He also said the winds the night before shook his house, blowing at 70 mph according to his gauge.

    Calabasas residents were also experiencing power cuts due to the wind and fire. SoCal Edison said the earliest possible restoration would be around 6 p.m.

    The fires burned in a community that was already reeling from a mass shooting that left 12 victims dead Wednesday night at a Thousand Oaks bar. The Thousand Oaks Teen Center was a family unification center Thursday, a place where families anxiously waited for updates on loved ones who were at the Borderline Bar. On Friday, the center was an evacuation center for people fleeing the fire. 

    "I think a lot of people should realize this is what your valuable life leads to," said a man from Ventura County as he pointed at his truck. "Plastic bags on the back of your pick-up truck."

    Along with assisting the growth of the fire, the high winds also deterred air support in battling the flames.

    The Woolsey Fire was first reported around 3:30 p.m. and by 4:45 p.m. It started east of Chatsworth near a former Rocketdyne facility.

    The Hill Fire burned just five miles away in Newbury Park, forcing more than 1,200 homes to evacuate and prompting the closure of the 101 Freeway. For coverage of that fire, click here

    Fall is historically one of the most dangerous times of the year for wildfires in California. Seven of the state's 10-most destructive wildfires occurred in October -- many fueled by monster winds, including Santa Ana gusts.

    Through Nov. 4, Cal Fire has reported about 5,600 fires that burned more than 621,700 acres. During that same period last year, the agency reported 5,800 fire that burned 316,600 acres. Over the last five years, California has averaged 5,293 fires that burned 231,400 acres during that interval.

    NBC4's Jonathan Lloyd and Heather Navarro contributed to this report.


    The Woolsey Fire burns through a home on Friday, Nov. 9, 2018.The Woolsey Fire burns through a home on Friday, Nov. 9, 2018.

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    Unhealthy air was plaguing Southern California due to multiple fires burning, including the 14,000-acre Woolsey Fire which had consumed thousands of acres and forced residents to pack up and flee Friday. 

    Parts of West San Fernando Valley and Northwest Coastal LA County were affected, according to the South Coast Air Quality Management District. 

    "It is difficult to tell where ash or soot from a fire will go, or how winds will affect the level of dust particles in the air, so we ask everyone to be aware of their immediate environment and to take actions to safeguard their health," Muntu Davis, Health Officer for Los Angeles County, said.

    "Smoke and ash can be harmful to health, even people who are healthy. People at higher risk include those with heart or lung diseases, children and older adults."

    Davis urged anyone who can see or smell smoke to stay indoors. 

    Children or those with heart disease, asthma, and other chronic respiratory diseases were also at a higher risk. 

    Wildfire smoke is a mixture of small particles, gases and water vapor. The small particles can cause burning eyes, runny nose, scratchy throat, headaches and illness. For those with sensitive conditions, the smoke can cause difficulty breathing, wheezing, coughing, fatigue, and even chest pain.

    Schools, recreational programs, and sports teams for children in smoke-impacted areas have been advised to suspend outside activities until conditions improve. Authorities were also advising families to put hikes and picnics on hold.

    How to protect your family from harmful effects of bad air quality:

     

    • If you see smoke, smell smoke, or see a lot of particles and ash in the air, avoid outdoor activity to limit your exposure to harmful air. Especially for those with heart or lung disease, the elderly and children.
    • Keep indoor air as clean as possible by keeping windows and doors shut. Air conditioners that re-circulate air within the home can help filter out harmful particles.
    • Avoid using air conditioning units that only draw in outside air or that do not have a re-circulating option. Check air conditioner filters and replace them regularly. Indoor air filtration devices with HEPA filters can reduce the level of particles that circulate indoors.
    • Go to an air conditioned public place such as a library or shopping center to stay cool and to protect yourself from harmful air if you do not own an air condition and it is too hot to keep doors and windows shut at home.
    • Do not smoke or use fireplaces, candles, and vacuums. Use damp cloths to clean dusty indoor surfaces.
    • Contact your doctor or go to an urgent care center immediately if you have symptoms of lung or heart disease that may be related to smoke exposure, including severe coughing, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, wheezing, chest tightness or pain, palpitations, nausea or unusual fatigue or lightheadedness. If life threatening, please contact 911.  
    • After a long time of heavy smoke, fine particles can build up indoors even though they cannot be seen. Wear a mask to prevent exposures to large particles, although most masks do not prevent exposure to fine particles and toxic gases, making it more dangerous to your health.
    • Follow the ash clean-up and food safety instructions.

     

    Recommendations for pets:

     

    • Leave pets indoors such as an enclosed garage or a house, avoid leaving pets outside.
    • If dogs or cats appear to be in respiratory distress, immediately take them to an animal hospital.  

     

    Symptoms of pet respiratory distress:

    For dogs include panting and/or an inability to catch their breath.

    For cats are less noticeable, but may include panting and/or an inability to catch their breath.



    Photo Credit: KNBC-TV

    Smoke from the Woolsey Fire in the Malibu area was sending smoke and ash into the sky Friday, Nov. 9, 2018.Smoke from the Woolsey Fire in the Malibu area was sending smoke and ash into the sky Friday, Nov. 9, 2018.

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    As thousands upon thousands of residents are forced from their homes, some reduced to smoking husks as the flames continue on, here are some ways to help.

    AirBnb

    AirBnb was looking for host homes to open their spaces for evacuees of the Woolsey and Hill Fires. 

    Airbnb's Open Homes Program aimed to connect evacuees, as well as emergency relief workers and volunteers, to AirBnB hosts.

    The program was set to be running through Nov. 29. 

    Hotels

    Hotels in Santa Ynez Valley were offering evacuees discounted rates. See more information here.

    The latest information on the Woolsey Fire can be found here.

    The latest information on the Hill Fire can be found here.

    The Griffith Park blaze was contained by Friday afternoon. 

    Bristol Farms was providing relief options for fire evacuees.

    Bristol Farms Woodland Hills in Calabasas Area

    What:

    • Power
    • WiFi
    • Charging stations
    • Free water

    Where: 23379 Mulholland Drive, corner of Mulholland and Valley Circle Drive., between Calabasas and Woodland Hills. Find more information here.

    Animals

    The Los Angeles County Department of Animal Care and Control was requesting that donations of alfalfa and hay be brought to Pierce College in Woodland Hills and Hansen Dam in Lake View Terrace as road closures permit. In addition, the department is requesting that donations of animal crates for cats and dogs be brought to Taft and Palisades high schools in Woodland Hills and Pacific Palisades, respective, Pierce College and the Thousand Oaks Teen Center.

    Malibu Valley Farms evacuated horses to the Hansen Dam Equestrian Center, and said they desperately needed gallon water buckets for the horses. 

    LAEC - Los Angeles Equestrian Center was at capacity, and were not accepting donations of any kind.

    The equestrian facility at Pierce College was full and at standing room only. Large animals (horses, goats, sheep, pigs)should be taken to Hansen Dam. For small animals, including cats, dogs, chickens and tortoises, county Animal Shelters, like West Valley Animal Shelter, are open for intake.

    Where:

    • Hansen Dam Equestrian Center, 11127 Orcas Ave., Lake View Terrace
    • Taft High School, 5461 Winnetka Ave. Woodland Hills
    • Palisades High School, 15777 Bowdoin St., Pacific Palisades
    • Thousand Oaks Teen Center, 1375 E. Janss Road.

    Shelter Hope, a pet shop, was taking in dogs and cats after staff said evacuees' pets were turned away from some shelters.

    Shelter Hope needed volunteers, funds, and the following supplies:

    • Pee pads
    • Bottled water for people
    • Dog food
    • Cat litter
    • Paper towels
    • Blankets/sheets
    • Cleaning supplies
    • Hand sanitizer
    • Metal crates

    Where: Across from the Golds Gym at 235 North Moorpark.

    Rides

    Lyft was partnering with United Way to offer rides to those who need help getting out of their homes in Ventura and Los Angeles counties. Riders dial 2-1-1, and can get a free ride. Lyft did note however, that it should not be used for those who need an emergency service. See more information here.

    Text-to-Help

    AT&T was offering a text-to-help service for victims of the fires. Anyone who wants to help can text "CAWILDFIRES" to 90999 to make a $10 donation to support RedCross disaster efforts.

    AT&T was also waiving charges for those affected by the fires. See more information here.

    In addition to T Mobile offering a similar deal, starting Saturday, Nov. 10 through Monday, T-Mobile will plan to have disaster relief trucks at the following locations:

    Pierce College – 7100 El Rancho Drive Woodland Hills

     

    • Saturday: from approximately 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
    • Sunday: from approximately 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
    • Monday: from approximately 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

     

    Taft Charter High School – 5461 Winnetka Ave., Woodland Hills

     

    • Saturday: from approximately 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
    • Sunday: from approximately 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
    • Monday: from approximately 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

     



      Photo Credit: KNBC-TV
      This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

      A home burned in the Malibu region after the 14,000-acre Woolsey Fire fanned by wind scorched earth and brush Nov. 9, 2018.A home burned in the Malibu region after the 14,000-acre Woolsey Fire fanned by wind scorched earth and brush Nov. 9, 2018.

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      As the Woolsey Fire continues to grow in Los Angeles County, many of the evacuees have no idea if their homes are still standing.

      The Glass family is on edge while they stay with family in La Jolla because the only clues about the fate of their Malibu home are being given to them through their doorbell surveillance system.

      They were finishing up renovations when the fire broke out.

      "It was supposed to be finished next week," says Julie Glass. She’s constantly watching the news and checking in on her surveillance system, "which had crazy fire embers going everywhere towards our house,” added Glass.

      “We don't know. We're hoping with our brush clearance and the fire precautions we did, our home will have survived."

      The last video her surveillance system captured was flames surrounding the house.

      "The infrastructure around it is ruined. We are off the grid, the solar power is done, there's a well, there's no way that it's okay," she said.

      The family has essentials and everything their baby needs. However, all their furniture, mementos and pictures are in their house. As soon as it's safe and the roads re-open, they’ll be able to check on their property.


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      In just a few days, the monster Camp Fire in Northern California tore through a Butte County community to become the state's most destructive wildfire on record.

      And, it's likely to cause even more destruction. Firefighters do not expect full containment until the end of November.

      It's stunning rate of destruction places it atop a list of historic wildfires in California, which faced the devastating October 2017 Fire Siege in the North Bay region and the December 2017 Thomas Fire in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties.  Below, a look at the most-damaging wildfires on record in California. The figures, obtained from CAL FIRE, are based on the number of structures — homes, barns, garages, sheds, commercial properties and other buildings — that were destroyed. 

      1. Camp Fire, November 2018

      The Camp Fire has burned through Northern California's Butte County with stunning speed. Cal Fire reported more than 6,400 residential structures have been destroyed and 260 commercial structures are lost since the fire started Nov. 8. The cause is under investigation. 

      2. Tubbs Fire, October 2017

      The Tubbs fire was the most destructive of a complex of wildfires known as the October Fire Siege in California's Wine Country. The fire, fanned by unrelenting winds in Sonoma and Napa counties, destroyed 5,643 buildings and resulted in 21 deaths, according to CAL FIRE. The fire started in the Calistoga area on the night of Oct. 8, spreading at a stunning rate and burning through entire neighborhoods, forcing some residents to run from their homes in search of shelter. The official cause remains under investigation.

      3. Oakland Hills Fire, October 1991

      Also called the Tunnel fire, the firestorm scorched hillsides in northern Oakland and southeastern Berkeley during an October weekend. Responsible for 25 deaths, the fire rekindled from an earlier grass fire and burned only 1,600 acres — not large when compared to other wildfires on the list. But it was located in a densely populated area with houses and other buildings in its path and ended up destroying 2,900 structures. Fanned by powerful wind gusts, the flare-up grew into a wall of fire that left some residents trapped in an inferno.

      4. Cedar Fire, October 2003

      The catastrophic San Diego County Cedar fire is one of the largest in California history. The 273,000-acre firestorm wiped out 2,820 structures and resulted in 15 deaths. The fire was started by a lost hunter who started a signal fire in Cleveland National Forest near Julian. It grew into a burning monster that stormed through wilderness areas and rural communities.

      5. Valley Fire, September 2015

      The 76,000-acre fire burned nearly 2,000 structures in Lake, Napa and Sonoma counties. In just about 24 hours, strong wind gusts pushed the fire to about 50,000 acres after it was started by a faulty electrical connection that caused nearby dry grass to ignite. Four residents were killed.

      6. Witch Fire, October 2007

      Damaged power lines caused arcing that set off another monstrous fire in San Diego County. The 197,990-acre Witch fire destroyed 1,650 structures. It burned during an onslaught of large wildfires in Southern California that scorched hundreds of thousands of acres in October 2007.

      7. Carr Fire, July 2018 

      The deadly Carr fire burned more than 115,000 acres in Shasta and Trinity counties as firefighters, mourning two colleagues killed in the firefight, continue to work through sweltering weather. At least 1,604 structures, including about 1,018 residences, were destroyed and seven deaths are linked to the fire. It is the only fire on this list to have burned in July. It is believed that have started due to a mechanical failure involving a vehicle, which sparked nearby brush.

      8. Nuns Fire, October 2017

      Part of a deadly complex of fires called the October Fire Siege, the Nuns fire began Oct. 8 and burned through at least 54,000 acres in Sonoma and Napa counties. At least 1,350 structures were destroyed. The official cause remains under investigation.

      9. Thomas Fire, December 2017

      The fire broke out Dec. 4, 2017 in Ventura County and, fanned by Santa Ana wind gusts, grew into one of the largtest fires on record in California. The fire destroyed 1,063 structures, including homes in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties. Two deaths, including a 32-year-old firefighter, were reported. In January, the city of Ventura sued Southern California Edison, alleging powerlines sparked the fire. The official cause remains under investigation.

      10. Old Fire, October 2003

      A 91,200-acre fire that burned 1,003 structures in San Bernardino County was set by a man in a fit of rage after a dispute with his godfather, according to prosecutors. Rickie Lee Fowler, convicted of murder and arson, was sentenced to death. Six deaths were reported in the fire, which began after a lighted road flare was tossed into the brush.



      Photo Credit: Justin Sullivan

      A business that was destroyed by the Camp Fire continues to smolder on Nov. 9, 2018, in Paradise, California.A business that was destroyed by the Camp Fire continues to smolder on Nov. 9, 2018, in Paradise, California.

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      LA Animal Services, as well as numerous shelters and rescue groups, put the important call out a number of times of year: We need your help to make space for incoming animals, while also giving the animals we're sheltering a loving home, either through a foster situation or permanently.

      And such an urgent call went out, on Nov. 9, from LA Animal Services, but this time "EMERGENCY," written in all caps, heightened the nature of the plea.

      Animals are arriving at shelters due to the multiple fires burning in our region, but making room to take those animals is the issue for the centers, as there are already numerous animals in-house.

      "If you can adopt or foster, please go to the closest LA City Animal Service Center to help create life-saving space during the high winds and fire," reads the message.

      "We are taking taking in evacuated LA county animals at our East Valley, West Valley, and West Los Angeles shelters."

      Can you help the effort to create that "life-saving space" at a local shelter?

      Visit the LA Animal Services site to find the locations and hours of the shelters listed, or the shelter nearest you.



      Photo Credit: LA Animal Services/Shutterstock

      Can you welcome an animal into your home, giving area shelters Can you welcome an animal into your home, giving area shelters "life-saving space" to house animals evacuated from areas impacted by the fires?

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      The 2018 Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree has arrived, marking the start of the holiday season in New York City. 

      The 72-foot-tall, 12-ton Norway Spruce was trucked onto the Plaza Saturday morning after making the 75-mile journey from its home in upstate New York Thursday.

      A crane raised the iconic holiday symbol off a 115-foot-long trailer and put it into place around 10 a.m. 

      About 50,000 LED lights and a new Swarovski crystal star designed by Daniel Libeskind will adorn the tree, which will be lit on Nov. 28.  It will remain on display until Jan. 7.

      The tree, which is 45-feet in diameter, comes from the Wallkill home of Shirley Figueroa and Lissette Gutierrez, who gave the spruce a last hug before it was chopped down.

      Crews then hoisted the tree on a flatbed to make its roughly 75-mile journey to midtown Manhattan, where it is expected to arrive on Saturday.

      "After we bought the house, the previous owner told us, 'Hey, by the way, the tree in the yard? Rockefeller Center has been scouting it," Figueroa told News 4. "When she told me that, I was like, 'Oh, that would be cool,' but I [didn't] believe it. Until they came knocking on the door." 

      Last year's tree, also a Norway Spruce, came from State College, Pennsylvania. 

      The first Rockefeller Center Christmas tree was put up in 1931 by workers building the complex during the Great Depression. The first official tree lighting there was in 1933.

      Figueroa and Gutierrez said they plan to replace the tree with new ones. 

      "I believe if you take something down, you gotta put something back, so we're definitely going to plant... a few more trees, because she took up a lot of space," Figueroa said. 

      While the two homeowners said it was difficult to part with the tree, both were excited to see it in all its glory at Rockefeller Center. 

      "It's been a little tougher for me," Gutierrez said. "But it's for a great cause — and everybody's going to see it," she said, noting that the tree will be donated to Habitat for Humanity and used for home-building lumber after the Christmas season.

      "I grew up going to Rockefeller Center every year, and I've only missed a few years that I couldn't get down because of work," Figueroa added.

      "It's going to be really amazing to be down there and know that the tree came from our yard." 



      Photo Credit: News 4

      The Rockefeller Center Christmas tree has arrived at 30 Rock and will be raised around 10 a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018.The Rockefeller Center Christmas tree has arrived at 30 Rock and will be raised around 10 a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018.

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      The Woolsey fire began Thursday during a day of hot, dry and windy weather in Ventura and Los Angeles counties.

      Photo Credit: Joshua Young

      A view of the smoke looking back on PCH.A view of the smoke looking back on PCH.

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      Air quality will be at unhealthy levels throughout the Los Angeles area as winds bring smoke from the Woolsey and Hill fires into populated areas on Saturday.

      The fires grew dramatically on Friday, fueled by Santa Ana winds that blew most of the smoke out to sea. Decreased winds and higher humidity on Saturday provide fire crews some much-needed relief in the effort to contain the fires. Though the winds are calmer, they have shifted into an onshore flow, blowing smoke from burning areas along the coast inland into cities.

      The South Coast Air Quality Management District has issued a smoke advisory for most of Los Angeles County and for parts of Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties.

      Officials advise residents of these areas to stay indoors whenever possible, especially children, the elderly and other groups with vulnerable health. If you must go outside, officials advise wearing an N95 mask to filter out the smoke.



      Photo Credit: Getty Images

      MALIBU, CA - NOVEMBER 09: Wind-driven flames move across Malibu Creek State Park during the Woolsey Fire on November 9, 2018 near Malibu, California. After a experiencing a mass shooting, residents of Thousand Oaks are threatened by the ignition of two nearby dangerous wildfires, including the Woolsey Fire which has reached the Pacific Coast at Malibu. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)MALIBU, CA - NOVEMBER 09: Wind-driven flames move across Malibu Creek State Park during the Woolsey Fire on November 9, 2018 near Malibu, California. After a experiencing a mass shooting, residents of Thousand Oaks are threatened by the ignition of two nearby dangerous wildfires, including the Woolsey Fire which has reached the Pacific Coast at Malibu. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)

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      As the Florida Secretary of State called for recounts in three key statewide races Saturday, gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum withdrew his concession from Election Night and called for all votes to be counted.

      The Secretary of State’s office ordered recounts for the Florida governor, U.S. Senate and commissioner of agriculture seats after reviewing the unofficial election results submitted from each county by Saturday's noon deadline.

      According to Florida law, a machine recount is ordered if races are within 0.5 percent. A hand recount is ordered if the margins are within 0.25 percent after the machine recount results are reviewed.

      Scott's campaign Saturday night announced more than 7,500 volunteer recount representatives had been "secured to monitor the recount process and ensure election officials are following the law."

      "Volunteer recount representatives will be deployed to Supervisors of Elections offices across the state and are trained to report any witnessed issues regarding machine set up and testing, ballot storage and transportation, the counting of votes and more, so that any potential issues can be quickly reviewed and resolved," the campaign said in a statement.

      In the official tally released Saturday, outgoing Republican Gov. Rick Scott had 4,098,107 votes and Democrat Sen. Bill Nelson had 4,085,545 votes – a difference of 12,562 votes with a 0.15 percent margin, which falls under the threshold requiring a manual recount. 

      In the governor's race, Republican Ron DeSantis had 4,075,879 votes and Democrat Andrew Gillum had 4,042,195 votes. That's a difference of 33,684 with a difference of 0.41 percent.

      "I'm replacing my earlier concession with an unapologetic call to count every vote," Gillum said in a press conference Saturday. 

      The Florida Cabinet position of agriculture commissioner is also being recounted. Nikki Fried is leading Matt Caldwell with a 0.07 percent margin. 

      Broward County will also recount the races for mayor of Plantation, mayor of Pompano, the West Park Commission and the Walnut Creek commission.

      Canvassing boards across the state have until 3 p.m. on Thursday to complete the machine recounts and submit those results.

      A manual recount would then be ordered if any of those races have the candidates within a margin of 0.25 percent of one another. In that case, the supervisors of elections in each Florida county would hand-check any ballots.

      As scheduled, the entire recount process must be completed by Nov. 18.



      Photo Credit: Getty Images

      Days after the election, Florida races between Sen. Bill Nelson and Gov. Rick Scott and Andrew Gillum and Ron DeSantis remained close.Days after the election, Florida races between Sen. Bill Nelson and Gov. Rick Scott and Andrew Gillum and Ron DeSantis remained close.

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      It's a crime that's creating tremendous outrage in the Inland Empire.

      Riverside Police have released surveillance photos of a woman who is accused of using stolen credit cards. Those credit cards came from a purse that was stolen from the passenger seat of a wrecked car, moments after the collision, as a severely-injured woman sat in the driver's seat. Now the victim's husband is asking for help finding the suspects who stole his wife's identity.

      Donald Nelson remembers his wife Terri as the love of his life.

      "There's always somebody in the family who is the glue that holds everything together. That was her," he said.

      Terri Nelson, a 64-year-old mother of four died on Nov. 1 from severe injuries she sustained when her car was rear-ended in August near the intersection of Trautwein Road and Van Buren Boulevard.

      "She was paralyzed from the neck down," Nelson said.

      In the moments immediately following the crash, as Terri sat motionless, a man came to the car and opened the passenger door, a witness told Nelson.

      "And of course the passenger side in front of the seat is where my wife always put her purse," he said.

      Later, as Donald sat by Terri's bedside, he realized his wife's purse was missing. Despite canceling credit cards and her checking account. Someone had already illegally racked up $6,000 in bills.

      Donald says he also saw two men breaking into his storage containers at his home a few days after the crash. He believes they had Terri's keys.

      Riverside police investigators collected surveillance video of a woman they believe was using Terri's credit cards at a local store. They're hoping someone will recognize her and her distinct tattoos.

      Donald is also hoping the suspects are caught, because he says what they did to the love of his life is simply despicable.

      "They don't deserve to be on the same planet as my wife," he said.


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      NASA is tracking wildfires globally, offering a view from high above Earth that reveals the scope and size of major fires, some of which produce smoke plumes that stretch for miles.

      Photo Credit: NASA Earth Observatory

      A view of the Camp Fire (above) in Northern California and the Hill and Woolsey fires in Southern California as seen on Nov. 9, 2018.A view of the Camp Fire (above) in Northern California and the Hill and Woolsey fires in Southern California as seen on Nov. 9, 2018.

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      Two members of Congress, a cabinet official, a presidential confidant and a frequent guest on Fox News are among those being considered by President Donald Trump to be the next attorney general, multiple sources tell NBC News.

      One of those, former New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, was a close adviser to the president in his 2016 presidential campaign. He has been largely sidelined by the administration since then but resurfaced at the White House on Thursday for what White House officials said was for a previously scheduled meeting on prison reform.

      Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, and retiring Rep. Trey Gowdy of South Carolina, have also joined the list of those in the running, the sources say.



      Photo Credit: AP

      In this Dec. 7, 2017 file photo, House Judiciary Committee member Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., speaks during a House Judiciary hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington.In this Dec. 7, 2017 file photo, House Judiciary Committee member Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., speaks during a House Judiciary hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington.

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      The list below is a tragic reminder of the heart-breaking loss that has resulted from wildfires in California. 

      Below, a look at some of the state's deadliest fires.

      Griffith Park Fire, October 1933

      What started as a debris pile fire in Los Angeles' 4,300-acre park at the eastern end of the Santa Monica Mountains became California's deadliest wildfire. On Oct. 3, 1933, Depression-era workers were taking care of other projects in the park when they were dispatched to fight the fire. Not trained in firefighting, they were unable to contain the flames and the fire spread to nearly 50 acres. Fanned by shifting winds, the fire raced up a canyon and overwhelmed workers. Twenty-nine were killed.

      Oakland Hills (Tunnel) Fire, October 1991

      Also called the Tunnel fire, the firestorm scorched hillsides in northern Oakland and southeastern Berkeley during an October weekend. The fire, rekindled from an earlier grass fire, burned only 1,600 acres — not large when compared to other wildfires on the list. But it was located in a densely populated area with houses and other buildings in its path. Fanned by powerful wind gusts, the flare-up grew into a wall of fire that left some residents trapped in an inferno that resulted in 25 deaths. Nearly 3,000 structures were destroyed.

      Camp Fire, November 2018

      In just a matter of days, the Camp Fire in Butte County became California's most destructive wildfire and its third-deadliest on record. As of Saturday, just two days after the fire began in the Northern California community of Paradise, 23 fatalities had been reported. A cause has not been determined.

      Tubbs Fire, October 2017

      The Tubbs fire part of a complex of wildfires known as the October Fire Siege in California's Wine Country. The fire, fanned by unrelenting winds in Sonoma and Napa counties, resulted in 21 deaths and destroyed 5,643 buildings, according to CAL FIRE.The fire started in the Calistoga area on the night of Oct. 8, spreading at a stunning rate and burning through entire neighborhoods, forcing some residents to run from their homes in search of shelter. 

      Cedar Fire, October 2003

      The catastrophic San Diego County Cedar fire remains the largest fire in California history. It also is one of the deadliest. The 273,000-acre firestorm wiped out 2,820 structures and resulted in 15 deaths. The fire, started by a lost hunter who set a signal fire in Cleveland National Forest near Julian, stormed through wilderness areas and rural communities.

      Rattlesnake Fire, July 1953

      In the summer of 1953, an arsonist set two fires in Mendocino National Forest in Northern California, setting off a chain of tragic events that would become a textbook case in studies of firefighting. Firefighters quickly got a handle on the first, but spot fires developed during the evening when winds fanned the second fire. Most were extinguished, but one flared up and quickly spread as firefighters sat down for a meal. Some of them ran uphill to a firefighter who warned them about the fire, but 15 who tried to escape down the canyon were overtaken and killed. A boulder at the Grindstone Overlook on Forest Highway 7 has a plaque with the victims' names. 

      Loop Fire, November 1966

      On Nov. 1, 1966, 12 members of the El Cariso Hotshots -- specially trained firefighters who ranged in age from 18 to 26 -- were killed. Again, a firefight turned deadly because of shifting winds. Some crewmembers were trapped when gusts carried spot fire flames up steep Pacioma Canyon in Angeles National Forest north of Los Angeles. Many of the 19 Hotshots who escaped suffered critical burns. El Cariso Park in Sylmar stands as a memorial to the victims.



      Photo Credit: Getty Images
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      Fire crews light a controlled fire in an attempt to counteract the Cedar Fire October 27, 2003 near Lakeside in San Diego, California.Fire crews light a controlled fire in an attempt to counteract the Cedar Fire October 27, 2003 near Lakeside in San Diego, California.

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      Been eating at Cole's, Originators of the French Dip, since the day it opened?

      Well, then... You've got a century and a decade behind you, a magnificent milestone occasionally and remarkably claimed by an especially hale human.

      If so, cheers to you, dear inspiring person.

      But perhaps you've made up for the fact that you weren't actually at the opening day of the iconic DTLA restaurant, way back in 1908, by visiting it dozens of times, maybe even 110 times, over the years, all to dip, dip, dip those famous, meat-laden, savory-as-savory-gets sandwiches.

      If so, chances are as good as mustard is tangy that you'll be at 118 E. 6th Street on Monday, Nov. 12, inside the cozy venue that boasts that bright blue neon sign, enjoying a French Dip, and a martini, too, all to celebrate the 110th birthday of Cole's.

      Nov. 12 is also National French Dip Day, which you surely have marked on every calendar around the house.

      As for the birthday deal that fans can nab?

      Check it out: A tenner will score you a classic Cole's French Dip plus a Mulholland Distilling martini. That's right: Ten bucks, plus tip, is the sweet song you'll be singing.

      Cole's as become a go-to for cocktails, too, over the years, making the addition of the spirited sip to the special meal particularly apt.

      Doors? Those open at 12 p.m., on the 12th, making this one easy to remember.

      But then, maybe you never forget, when it comes to Cole's? Like we postulated, perhaps you've eaten there 110 times, or more, over your lifetime?

      Your lifetime didn't need to begin in 1908, or even 1978 or '88, to have hit such a meaty milestone.

      For more details on the birthday bash, the deal, and the ever-colorful Cole's, click.



      Photo Credit: Alysia Gray Painter

      Nov. 12 also happens to be National French Dip Day, too, which is apt (and appetizing).Nov. 12 also happens to be National French Dip Day, too, which is apt (and appetizing).

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      A brush fire burning Thursday afternoon quickly scorched thousands of acres in Ventura County, forcing mandatory evacuations and a closure of the 101 Freeway.

      Photo Credit: U.S. Forest Service

      The USDA Forest Service was providing assistance to the crews on Woolsey Fire and Hill Fire on Friday, Nov. 9, 2018.The USDA Forest Service was providing assistance to the crews on Woolsey Fire and Hill Fire on Friday, Nov. 9, 2018.

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      Saying "thank you," it is often said, can go a very long way, but there are a number of event-oriented opportunities to show our veterans the gratitude they so deeply deserve.

      Those events arise on Veterans Day each year, and finding a gathering, or two, that you can attend, if you're a veteran, love a veteran, or just want to show your thanks, is almost as simple as looking down the street.

      Well, perhaps a list of Southern California events would be handy, and while many communities will commemorate Sunday, Nov. 11 in their own ways, consider being a part of...

      Long Beach Veterans Day Parade and Celebration: Do note that this particular happening occurs on the day before Veterans Day. So you'll want to be along the route by 10 a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 10. Atlantic Avenue is the main thoroughfare, with a South Street start, so study all before heading to this LBC tradition.

      USS IOWA: As is tradition, the Battleship Iowa Museum will pay tribute to Veterans Day through a variety of activities, including the unveiling of a plaque dedicated to San Pedro's heroes, live bands, and free eats. Are you "Active, Retired, or Reserve Military"? Your entry to the Nov. 11 Veterans Appreciation Day is complimentary. 

      Salute to Veterans: Keep Saturday, Nov. 10 in mind, at 10 in the morning, for this event based at the OC Fair & Event Center in Costa Mesa. Heroes Hall will be the center of the salute, which will also include '80s rock, live music from the Pacific Symphony's brass quintet, and a musical appearance by Vanguard University of Southern California. Admission is free for all.

      VA West Los Angeles: Make for the Orlando Quad for the Nov. 11 Veterans Day Celebration, which will both honor the occasion at hand and serve as a centennial remembrance of the 100th anniversary of WWI. The unveiling of the Healing Garden, music, and lots more will fill the day.

      San Fernando Valley Veterans Day Parade 2018: The start time is perfectly clear and easy to remember — 11:11 a.m. — and the date is Sunday, Nov. 11. The starting point? It's all happening at Laurel Canyon and San Fernando Mission Boulevards. Be sure to stop by the Ritchie Valens Recreation Center for a carnival, too.

      National Parks Free Day: Thinking of spending Sunday, Nov. 11 hiking Yosemite Valley or taking in Zabriskie Point in Death Valley National Park? It's a fee-free entrance day at those national parks that usually have a get-in admission. That includes several California-based national parks, such as Yosemite, Death Valley, Joshua Tree, and more. This is also the final fee-free day at the national parks for 2018.



      Photo Credit: Veterans Day

      Step aboard the USS Iowa on Nov. 11 for Veterans Appreciation Day, or join the VA West Los Angeles in thanking veterans via a host of Nov. 11 activities.Step aboard the USS Iowa on Nov. 11 for Veterans Appreciation Day, or join the VA West Los Angeles in thanking veterans via a host of Nov. 11 activities.

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