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    Dozens of Boston-area college students are without a home after a massive fire Saturday.

    Some 114 residents in all -- including up to 70 students from area colleges -- were displaced by the fire that ripped through a 5-story building in Boston’s Fenway neighborhood.

    Officials responded to 104 Hemenway Street, which is home to Northeastern University and Berklee College of Music students, just after 3:15 p.m. Saturday.

    Around eight residents and one firefighter were taken to the hospital for non-life threatening injuries, Boston EMS said.

    “There were no alarms going off in our building, so we had no idea what was going on. I just heard glass shattering,” one young woman said.

    Northeastern student Adam Petricca caught heavy smoke on camera when he was taking a nearby alley to get home.

    A roof collapsing and harsh weather were big challenges while firefighters tried to battle the blaze.

    “The wind keeps pushing it one way then pushing it the other way, so as you see every once in a while the wind will shift it comes down at you then it shifts another way and goes away,” Fire Commissioner Joe Finn said Saturday.

    All of this happened on parents weekend at Northeastern.

    "I think it's scary for a lot of people even parents who have kids around here, not necessarily in this building. But the Fire Department did an incredible job," said Mayor Marty Walsh, who was on scene Saturday.

    Mayor Walsh says his administration is working with the colleges to make sure the students have alternate housing.

    Fire officials remained on scene overnight to hit "hot spots."

    Investigators were in the building Sunday morning, trying to determine the cause of the fire but say it is not considered suspicious at this time.


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    The final Kershaw Day?

    The Los Angeles Dodgers are one loss away from their second straight World Series elimination on their home turf. 

    The only other team to experience such heartbreak in front of their fans? The 1936 and 1937 New York Giants at the Polo Grounds.

    Dodgers starter Clayton Kershaw knows that disappointment firsthand. He's been on the mound in games that have ended his team's season short of a World Series title, and he's been on the mound in elimination games that have extended the season as well. 

    Kershaw pitched four scoreless innings in Game 7 of the World Series last year, and then watched from the Dodgers dugout as the Houston Astros celebrated their first championship on Los Angeles soil.

    Less than one year later, Kershaw is on the precipice of experiencing that same pain and disappointment, as he takes the mound on Sunday in what could be the final game of the MLB season and the final game of Kershaw's career as a Dodger.

    Should Kershaw decide to opt out of the final year of his contract after the season, he would become an unrestricted free agent, free to sign with any team of his choosing as he enters the second half of his career. 

    Kershaw's Hall of Fame legacy is already cemented, but his postseason legacy is another story altogether. One of the greatest left-handers ever to take the mound, Kershaw has a 4.28 career postseason ERA and has had as many nightmarish games in the playoffs than he's had "vintage Kershaw" games. 

    "I don't really care about legacy," Kershaw said during his pregame press conference before Game 4. "I don't really care what people think of me or perceive of me. Game 5 is very important to win the World Series, and I'm looking forward to pitching that game and hopefully putting us in a great spot going back to Boston." 

    On Sunday, in Game 5, fresh off one of the greatest bullpen collapses in World Series History, Kershaw will try and bring his team back from the brink, and extend the series to Boston. 

    If Kershaw struggles, and the Dodgers are eliminated again, forced to watch their opponent celebrate on their own field as they host the coveted prize that Los Angeles has sought for 30 years, then it's possible the three-time Cy Young Award winner signs elsewhere as he chases a championship.

    If that happens, then he will be haunted by the "what if's" for the remainder of his career. 

    What if Kershaw wasn't lit up in Game 6 of the 2013 NLCS in St. Louis against the Cardinals and the Dodgers forced a Game 7?

    What if Kershaw never surrendered that back-breaking homer in Game 4 of the 2014 NLDS when Matt Adams erased a two-run lead with a three-run homer?

    What if Kershaw had command of his curveball in Game 6 of the 2016 NLCS against the Chicago Cubs at Wrigley Field?

    What if Kershaw didn't surrender not one, but two, four-run leads in Game 5 of the 2017 World Series at Minute Maid Park in Houston?

    If this is in fact the last time we see Clayton Kershaw pitch at Chavez Ravine in a Dodgers uniform, then fans will remember one of the greatest regular season pitchers they've ever seen.

    But they'll also remember the multiple chances they had to win a World Series title, all placed in the steady hands of their future Hall of Famer, only to see the trophy slip through his grasp, time and time again.

    First pitch of Game 5 at Dodger Stadium is scheduled for 5:15PM PT and will be broadcast live on FOX.



    Photo Credit: Elsa/Getty Images

    Clayton Kershaw #22 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts as he is taken out of the game during the fifth inning against the Boston Red Sox in Game One of the 2018 World Series at Fenway Park on October 23, 2018 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)Clayton Kershaw #22 of the Los Angeles Dodgers reacts as he is taken out of the game during the fifth inning against the Boston Red Sox in Game One of the 2018 World Series at Fenway Park on October 23, 2018 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)

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    Since Sean McVay took over in 2017 not many people have known what to do with the Rams offense. They led the NFL in scoring a year ago and started Sunday’s game against the Packers averaging 33 points a game this season.

    For a half, the game plan Green Bay put together was flawless. For another half, Los Angeles was as unstoppable as we’ve seen it. Of course, so was Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers, so we got to watch a treat right before Halloween.

    In a game where offenses and defenses played equally well it came down to special teams and the Rams were better. Two big mistakes in the 4th quarter cost the Pack in a 29-27 loss.

    Rodgers led a pair of scoring drives in the first half to put the Packers up 10-0. For most of the opening 30 minutes the Packers kept the Rams off-balance. L.A.’s best offensive play was arguably a fake punt where punter Johnny Hekker threw a 12-yard pass to defensive back Sam Shields to keep a drive alive. They were right back out there to punt again after three straight incompletions.

    It was Hekker doing his usual job that helped put the Rams on the board. He stuck a punt down at the Green Bay 1-yard line and running back Jamaal Williams was stuffed in the end zone by linebacker Mark Barron for a safety. L.A.’s offense finally contributed at the end of the half with Jared Goff hit wide receiver Josh Reynolds for a 1-yard TD that sent the game to halftime with Green Bay up 10-8.

    Mason Crosby hit a 53-yard field goal to stretch the lead to 13-8 and then the Rams got cranking thanks to a heavy dose of Todd Gurley. The running back who is on a pace to flirt with the NFL single-season touchdown record (31 by LaDainian Tomlinson in 2006) took a short pass from Goff and ran 30 yards for a touchdown. Gurley also caught the 2-point conversion and L.A. had its first lead of the day at 16-13.

    On their next drive Goff hit Reynolds again, this time for a 19-yard score, and it looked like the Rams were going to run away with it. Instead Aaron Rodgers started doing Aaron Rodgers things.

    On 3rd and 10 with L.A. having all kinds of momentum the future Hall of Famer had a defender grabbing onto him threw a 41-yard dart to Davante Adams and two plays later running back Aaron Jones broke loose for a 33-yard TD run that cut the lead to 26-20.

    On their next possession Rodgers hit a wide-open Marquez Valdes-Scantling, who had cornerback Marcus Peters beat, for a 40-yard TD and a 27-26 lead. After that the fireworks ceased for a bit.

    They picked up again late in the 4th quarter. On 3rd and long Aaron Donald broke through to sack Rodgers and force a pun, which J.K. Scott only sent 25 yards downfield to the Green Bay 40. One long run by Gurley set up Greg Zuerlein for a 34-yard field goal to put the Rams back on top 29-27.

    With about 2:00 to play Rodgers had a chance to lead a game-winning drive. He never got the chance. Ty Montgomery fumbled the kickoff at his own 21 and the #Rams recovered to ice the game and move to 8-0.

    Next week things don’t get any easier for them when they head to New Orleans to face Drew Brees and the Saints.


    Todd Gurley had another big game on Sunday. (Getty Images)Todd Gurley had another big game on Sunday. (Getty Images)

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    Interfaith Solidarity Network held its second annual Interfaith Solidarity March on Sunday in Woodland Hills, a day after a gunman killed 11 congregants at a synagogue in Pennsylvania.

    The march, hosted by 70 other sponsors and local congregations from several faith traditions had only one main goal—to promote togetherness, understanding and collaboration through shared values.

    The march was scheduled for Sunday well before the mass shooting at synagogue in Pittsburgh occurred on Saturday.

    The march started at Temple Aliyah on Valley Circle Boulevard in Woodland Hills and made a stop at Woodland Hills Presbyterian Church, then continued to its final stop at Ezzi Masjid Mosque where all participants had dinner.

    There was also voter registration at the beginning and end of the march.



    Photo Credit: KNBC-TV

    Marchers gathered in Woodland Hills for the second annual unity event.Marchers gathered in Woodland Hills for the second annual unity event.

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    Disappointment at Dodger Stadium…again.

    At the end of the baseball season Clayton Kershaw retires to his ranch in Dallas, Texas where he rests and reflects on the previous campaign.

    Last winter, Kershaw had to reflect on a season that came agonizingly close to a World Series title. 

    Kershaw pitched four scoreless innings of relief in a 5-1 loss to the Houston Astros in Game 7, and watched from the Dodgers dugout as the visiting team celebrated on the mound that the former MVP calls home.

    Over the course of the next year, the sting of that loss did not abate. It stayed with Kershaw throughout the 2018 season. A year that featured a tough start as the Dodgers fell 10 games below .500 on May 14, only to fight and claw their way back to their sixth straight division title.

    Kershaw knows the disappointment well, he's often been the guy on the mound when his team's been eliminated before, but this time the heartbreak feels like a punch in the gut.

    After using the disappointment of last year as a spur all season long, Kershaw returned to the Fall Classic, with a chance to rewrite history as well as his own legacy.

    Instead, he reopened the narrative that he wilts under the pressure of the postseason, in what could have been his final game in a Dodger uniform.

    "I'm disappointed. Yeah, just disappointed, I think," said Kershaw who has three days to decide if he's going to return to the Dodgers or opt-out of his contract and become a free agent. "There's only one team that can win and we know that, but it just hurts worse when you make it all the way and get second place. So having done that two years in a row now, it doesn't make it any easier."

    Kershaw surrendered home runs to Steve Pearce, Mookie Betts, and J.D. Martinez as the Boston Red Sox won their ninth World Series title in team history, 5-1, over the Los Angeles Dodgers on Sunday night at Dodger Stadium. 

    "I made a few mistakes tonight and sometimes you just wish they'd find a gap or find a single or something like that. And instead, they went over the fence tonight," said Kershaw. "That's the story of the game."

    The real story of the game begins one year prior, when the Dodgers dropped a heartbreaking Game 7 to the Houston Astros on their home soil. 

    The Dodgers knew the only way to rebound from that Game 7 loss was to win the World Series the following year. They battled through injuries, through heart conditions, and a rollercoaster ride of a season, just for the opportunity to salve their regret.

    Only they didn't seize it for the second year in a row.

    "That one really hurt," closer Kenley Jansen said of the 2017 World Series loss. "It motivates you to get back here and we did. This one hurts too. At the end of the day we're still human and it's going to hurt. This loss is what will keep me going and will make me better."

    The game began with a familiar script: 

    A first inning homer off Kershaw, and a Red Sox lead that they would not relinquish.

    Steve Pearce, the World Series MVP, continued his hot hitting from Game 4, when he crushed a 91 MPH first pitch fastball from Kershaw over the wall in center field for a two-run homer in the first inning.

    "You've got to strike early on that guy," Pearce said of his first inning homer of Kershaw. "You saw how he settled in in the middle innings. And, yeah, just to be able to get my pitch and not miss it, and give us an early lead, that was big for our club."

    Entering the game, the Red Sox were a perfect 9-0 when scoring first in the postseason. They improved to 10-0 after the victory, tying their 2004 team as the only two teams to have a perfect record in the postseason when striking first.

    David Freese gave the Dodgers life when he cut the lead in half with his second leadoff homer of the postseason.

    "I knew Freese wanted to hit the ball to the right field, and he's a really good October hitter," said David Price who surrendered the homer. "He has been for every team he's been on at this stage, winning the World Series MVP, whenever they played Texas, '11 or '12, I don't know what year it was, but he swings the bat well."

    Los Angeles had an opportunity to tie the game when Freese hit a flyball to right field in his second at-bat that J.D. Martinez lost in the lights. The ball bounced behind him, and Freese ended up on third with a one-out triple.

    However, Justin Turner and Enrique Hernandez were unable to get him home, as they grounded out and flied out, to strand Freese on third and end the inning.

    "We could’ve done more and won the championship, but it got out of our hands," said Yasiel Puig following the loss. "We practically gifted it to Boston, who is a great team. We did things we shouldn’t have done. We made bad decisions. We did bad things on the field that gave them an easier victory."

    Mookie Betts added an insurance run for the Red Sox when he broke out of an 0-for-13 slump and hit his first postseason home run off a slider from Kershaw in the sixth inning.

    "I tried to keep it at two [runs] as best I could," said Kershaw. "And then the homers got to me there at the end. I didn't make a whole lot of adjustments, just some bad pitches in there."

    Martinez, another American League MVP candidate, followed an inning later, with a solo shot to dead-center off Kershaw, and the Red Sox prepared the champagne, as they opened up a three run lead with three innings remaining.

    "I never knew there were so many Red Sox fans here," Martinez said of the reaction he received from the sea of red mixed in with the Dodger blue after his home run.

    Kershaw suffered the loss for the second time in the series, surrendering four runs on seven hits with no walks and five strikeouts in seven innings.

    "You have to give credit to the Red Sox," a disappointed Kershaw said after the game. "They're a great team. They won, I think, 108 games in the regular season. They beat two teams that also won a hundred games in the postseason. And then beat us four games to one."

    Pearce hit his second homer of the game, and his third in the last two games to go with seven RBI, when he hit a solo shot off reliever Pedro Baez in the eighth inning.

    Predictably, Pearce was handed the World Series MVP trophy after the game, and soaked in the moment on the field as fans from Fenway Park that traveled all the way to California began chanting his name and singing "Sweet Caroline."

    "Best feeling in my life," said Pearce after the game. "This is what you grow up wishing that you could be a part of something like this.This has been a lifelong journey. And to be here right now is a dream come true."

    As one pitcher yielded to his postseason narrative, another one rewrote it, as David Price outdueled Kershaw, allowing only Freese's leadoff homer in the game.

    "David pitched a great game and I got outpitched," admitted Kershaw about his counterpart.

    Pitching on three days rest from his victory in Game 2 of the series, Price once again shut down the Dodgers lineup, allowing just one run on three hits with two walks and five strikeouts in seven superb innings.

    "However many times I've failed in October, however many times I failed in the regular season or against the Yankees, my confidence was never altered," said Price. "I always had belief in myself and my abilities. To be able to come through on this stage and in October for myself and for my teammates, I know I can do it now. And it's always a good feeling to have."

    Price won his third straight start of the postseason on Sunday, and became the first pitcher in MLB history to beat Cy Young winners in the finale of an LCS and the World Series in the same year.

    "I hold all the cards now," Price told the media after the game about his postseason narrative. "That feels so good. I can't tell you how good it feels to hold that trump card. And you guys have had it for a long time. You've played that card extremely well. But you don't have it anymore, none of you do, and that feels really good."

    The 2018 Dodgers were defined by inconsistency, an inability to hit with runners in scoring position, and struggles against left-handed pitching. All three of those blemishes befell them in the World Series.

    Similar to the 2017 World Series, the Dodgers held leads in three of the five games in the series, including two games they lost. Last year, the Dodgers led Games 2 and 5 against the Astros, only to relinquish leads on late-inning rallies by their rivals.

    The Red Sox came-from-behind twice in the series, and relinquished only one lead, on an errant throw by Ian Kinsler, in Game 3. Other than that, they refused to go down without a fight.

    You can't same the same about the Dodgers.

    Los Angeles has found themselves in a 3-1 deficit in the World Series five different times in their franchise history, they have lost in five every single time.

    On their journey to their fourth World Series crown in the last 15 years, the Red Sox could do no wrong.

    They finished with 108 wins and the best record in baseball. They beat up on the rival Yankees in the ALDS, dethroned the champs in Houston in the ALCS, and then dispatched of the two-time NL pennant winners in five games in the World Series.

    For Dodgers manager Dave Roberts, once a member of the Boston Red Sox when they broke the curse in 2004, he suffered the sting of defeat on the game's greatest stage for the second year in a row, bombarded by questions about his in-game decisions, and left to rethink them in another offseason full of regrets.

    "It's not easy. It hurts. It's disappointing. All that," said Roberts after the loss. "Obviously I understand my job is to ultimately lead us to a championship, and we haven't accomplished that yet."

    Somewhere in the visitor's clubhouse, soaked in champagne and beer, was Red Sox manager Alex Cora, celebrating in that exact location within the confines of Dodger Stadium for the second straight year. 

    After serving as a bench coach for the the Houston Astros in 2017, Cora knew what it took to win it all, and brought Boston back to the Promised Land. As a player, Cora won the championship with the Red Sox in 2007, and on Sunday became the first manager from Puerto Rico ever to win a World Series.

    "As a player I was just utility guy, last year I was a bench coach. This feels better," said Cora. "Ironic enough, we win it here. So it goes full circle."

    As for Los Angeles, only the 1936 and 1937 New York Giants know the sting of having lost back-to-back World Series on their home soil.

    Now the Dodgers join them.

     

     

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    Photo Credit: Harry How/Getty Images
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    Clayton Kershaw #22 of the Los Angeles Dodgers walks off the field after pitching during the seventh inning against the Boston Red Sox in Game Five of the 2018 World Series at Dodger Stadium on October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)Clayton Kershaw #22 of the Los Angeles Dodgers walks off the field after pitching during the seventh inning against the Boston Red Sox in Game Five of the 2018 World Series at Dodger Stadium on October 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

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    Lots of strange things happen when your daughter hosts a creepy, campy cooking show on Netflix. For instance, sometimes your home gets turned into a razor-toothed monster mansion in preparation for Halloween.The house at 27773 Pacific Street in Highland has undergone a terrifying transformation in honor of “The Curious Creations of Christine McConnell,” which premiered on Netflix this year. McConnell’s parents say everyone is welcome to come visit on Halloween, if they’re not too terrified.

    Lots of strange things happen when your daughter hosts a creepy, campy cooking show on Netflix. For instance, sometimes your home gets turned into a razor-toothed monster mansion in preparation for Halloween.Lots of strange things happen when your daughter hosts a creepy, campy cooking show on Netflix. For instance, sometimes your home gets turned into a razor-toothed monster mansion in preparation for Halloween.

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    A pulsing, humming sound that awoke an American diplomat in China night after night left her vomiting, off balance and with an aching head, according to NBC News, in the first comprehensive account of a suspected "health attack" on U.S. diplomats overseas.

    She was eventually evacuated to the U.S., where doctors diagnosed vision and balance disorders and an "organic brain injury," similar to what doctors saw in more than two dozen people living in the U.S. embassy in Havana, according to interviews, documents and medical records.

    Cuba and China have denied any role in the mysterious attacks, and now diplomats and doctors tell NBC News that they're concerned the U.S. may be downplaying whatever happened, at least in Guangzhou. (Citing privacy issues, the State Department wouldn't say if the China case is considered confirmed.)

    Some of the diplomats who were evacuated have experienced suspected harassment and break-ins, which officials tell NBC News the FBI is investigating.



    Photo Credit: Kelvin Chan/AP, File

    This June 7, 2018, file photo shows a man carry an umbrella past the U.S. consulate building in Guangzhou in south China's Guangdong province after the United States evacuated several workers over medical testing that revealed they might have been affected by unexplained health incidents that have hurt U.S. personnel in Cuba and China.This June 7, 2018, file photo shows a man carry an umbrella past the U.S. consulate building in Guangzhou in south China's Guangdong province after the United States evacuated several workers over medical testing that revealed they might have been affected by unexplained health incidents that have hurt U.S. personnel in Cuba and China.

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    Seven people at a Riverside nightclub Halloween party were wounded in a shooting early Monday.

    Gunfire was reported around at the Sevilla Nightclub at 3252 Mission Inn Ave., the site of a party based on "The Purge" horror film and TV series. Officers found two victims with gunshot wounds who were taken to hospitals for treatment, police said. Another five people showed up at hospitals for treatment of what police termed "gunshot injuries" suffered at the nightclub.

    None of the injuries are considered life-threatening. 

    The club was blocked off by yellow crime scene tape early Monday. Witnesses described a chaotic scene. 

    "It was like ten in a row," a witnesses said of the rapid gunfire. "People were falling, and there were people right by the door just taking chains and wallets and phones."

    The initial investigation indicates there was an altercation inside the club that led to the shooting. Information regarding the shooter and a possible motive were not immediately available.

    Police recovered several bullet casings of different calibers. More than one person might have opened fire, police said. 

    Anyone with information can call police at 951-353-7130 or 951-353-7134. Tips also can be submitted to rpdtips@riversideca.gov.



    Photo Credit: Toni Guinyard/KNBC-TV

    Yellow crime scene tape is pictured outside a Riverside nightclub Monday Oct. 29, 2018.Yellow crime scene tape is pictured outside a Riverside nightclub Monday Oct. 29, 2018.

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    John Hacker of Fountain Valley is the quintessential Southern Californian. He is a surfer, a beach volleyball player, and an outdoorsman. But now he's facing losing all of that because of a tragic moment over a decade ago.

    Twelve years ago, Hacker was run over by a car while waiting at a red light on his scooter.

    "I was all busted up, shattered ankle, busted pelvis, compound fracture on my femur, busted shoulder," he said.

    His wounds healed, but an infection lurked undetected. At first it defied anti-biotics, then mutated, and colonized into a full-blown staph infection. In order to avoid a potential death sentence, Hacker now has to have his leg amputated.

    "I didn't want it to happen, I still don't, but I've run out of choices," he said. "I don't want to be in a box. I still have a lot of life left."

    Losing a limb can be incredibly difficult, not just physically, but emotionally. This will not be an easy transition for Hacker, but he has the support from Randy Alltizer who had his two legs amputated in three years, and he has never let it stop him from having a positive attitude.

    "I've never been one to say poor me. I've always had a really good attitude," said Alltizer.

    For someone facing amputation, having the guidance of a person who has been through similar circumstances can be incredibly helpful, according to Valerie Sanden, Director of Outpatient Wound Care at Fountain Valley Regional Hospital.

    "When you talk to someone else who's had it and not just a physician, it just make a world of difference in what they know they're about to go through," said Sanden.

    Randy is able to provide practical advice to John, like tips on getting around in bed after surgery. He's also able to provide John with a view of what lies in future and show him how much he'll still be capable of.

    "I can walk. I can cook. I can drive myself. I can get around. I can do yard work," Randy said.

    "He's a great example of who I need to follow and he will help me get through this," John said.

    The only thing John wishes for now is to continue with his life--with a leg or without it; although he hopes to be able to get a waterproof leg so he can get back on the water.



    Photo Credit: Lori Bentley/KNBC-TV

    Losing a limb can be incredibly difficult, not just physically, but emotionally. This will not be an easy transition for John Hacker, but he has the support from Randy Alltizer who had his two legs amputated in three years, and he has never let it stop him from having a positive attitude.Losing a limb can be incredibly difficult, not just physically, but emotionally. This will not be an easy transition for John Hacker, but he has the support from Randy Alltizer who had his two legs amputated in three years, and he has never let it stop him from having a positive attitude.

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    Former Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson on Monday called on President Donald Trump to tone down his rhetoric, even as Trump again derided the media as "fake news" that was stoking "great anger" in the U.S.

    Johnson, who served as Homeland Security chief under former President Barack Obama, told CNN that recent hate crimes "should be a wake-up call to all Americans to insist that their leaders tone it down and try to restore civility to our dialogue."

    He said that if he were still Homeland Security secretary, he'd be engaging with Trump, who has the "loudest microphone," to "try to reset the tone" of the country's political discourse, NBC News reported.

    Trump used Twitter Monday morning to rip the media as "the true enemy of the people."



    Photo Credit: AP

    President Donald Trump speaks during a rally at Southern Illinois Airport Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018, in Murphysboro, Ill.President Donald Trump speaks during a rally at Southern Illinois Airport Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018, in Murphysboro, Ill.

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    Take a peek at some of the pup-tastic outfits seen at the 2018 Long Beach lark.

    Photo Credit: Justin Rudd

    The awww-dorable Haute Dog Howl'oween Parade gave a happy bark on Sunday, Oct. 28 at Marina Vista Park in Long Beach.The awww-dorable Haute Dog Howl'oween Parade gave a happy bark on Sunday, Oct. 28 at Marina Vista Park in Long Beach.

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    Dodgers fans had to watch another team celebrate a World Series victory on their home field for the second consecutive years.

    Photo Credit: AP

    A Los Angeles Dodgers fan wipes his face during the eighth inning in Game 5 of the World Series baseball game against the Boston Red Sox on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)A Los Angeles Dodgers fan wipes his face during the eighth inning in Game 5 of the World Series baseball game against the Boston Red Sox on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

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    New York City's only Republican congressional district could fall in November if a young combat veteran can convince many of the district's Democrats to vote for their party, for a change.

    New York's 11th Congressional District, made up mostly of Staten Island and its "Reagan Democrats," has twice sent Republican Rep. Daniel Donovan to Congress. He's betting that his support of President Donald Trump won't hurt him in the majority-Democrat district — especially since he's taken a couple of key votes against Trump's agenda, on taxes and health care.

    Trying to unseat Donovan is newcomer Max Rose, whose campaign emphasizes that he's a veteran of the war in Afghanistan and a former health care professional — the district has been hard hit by the opioid crisis. What he does not emphasize is that he's a Democrat. 

    It's set up a race that local political observers say could go either way. But the fact that it's even competitive speaks to the strength of Democrats' "blue wave" that's threatening to flip congressional districts across the country.

    "The question is: Will that blue wave come to shore on Staten Island?" said Brian Browne, a political analyst and director of government relations at St. John's University in New York City.

    This article, part 5 in a series, examines one of the key battleground races for control of the House of Representatives in the Nov. 6 midterm elections. Carried by grassroots momentum, Democrats must take 23 seats from Republicans to win the balance of power. They are contending with Republicans' experience and organization, and an outspoken but polarizing president.

    Staten Island is connected to the rest of New York City by just one bridge and a famous ferry, and it's an anomaly when it comes to city politics — it tends to lean Republican while the rest of the city largely votes Democratic. 

    Trump easily won the 11th District, which comprises Staten Island and a small segment of Brooklyn across the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge, despite it having 200,410 registered Democrats to 117,983 Republicans as of April, according to New York state voter enrollment data.

    Doug Muzzio, a professor at Baruch College's Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, describes the district's voters as "Reagan Democrats" and "Giuliani Democrats."

    Trump won by about 10 percentage points in the 2016 presidential election, while Donovan beat his Democratic challenger by more than 20 percentage points.

    "They look at what somebody has done — not what they say — and then they vote for the person that they want representing them. So I have great faith in them," Donovan said in a phone interview while discussing voters.

    Still, Staten Island isn't unreachable territory for Democrats. It narrowly voted for President Barack Obama in 2012 and elected a Democrat to Congress 10 years ago: Mike McMahon served one term (when Staten Island was in the 13th District, before a round of redistricting) and is now the borough's district attorney.

    And while there is no public polling data on the race, Browne and Muzzio say it remains unclear whether Donovan or Rose will win the seat on Nov. 6.

    Rose has been the underdog, but recently, the nonpartisan Cook Political Report changed its race rating from likely Republican to the less-sure lean Republican on the strength of Rose's fundraising going into the final stretch.

    "What I think that we find in Staten Island and South Brooklyn as well ... is that this district is filled with people who vote for the person. Not the party," Rose said in a phone interview.

    Rose was given a Purple Heart and Bronze Star for his service in Afghanistan and remains a National Guardsman; he has the endorsement of the non-partisan super PAC With Honor, which backs veterans. A first-time politician, he also has the endorsements of Obama and former Vice President Joe Biden, but attacks Democratic New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio in campaign ads.

    Rose said he's been startled by "the fact that people have lost their faith and their trust in both parties, in the entire political process."

    Donovan has been proud of Trump's endorsement, which helped him survive a primary challenge from the right. And the former Staten Island's district attorney argues he's opposed the president's policies when it's good for the district.

    Trump was never popular in the rest of New York City, and this election is the first time people can express how they feel about his policies through voting, Browne said.

    "For some people, this will be a way to go out — if they do in fact go out and vote — to send a message to the White House. That could be a challenge for Dan Donovan, being that he's a Republican," he said.

    Trump still has support in Staten Island, though several Republicans in the Todt Hill neighborhood didn't want to discuss the looming election with NBC last week, for fear of angering their neighbors with their political opinions.

    Republican Doreen Tsolis, a 50-year-old Salvation Army employee from the St. George neighborhood, said she still hasn't decided who to vote for. She hates Trump, she said, but she doesn't want the president to influence her vote in the election. 

    "He's doing nothing for us actually, making our lives miserable. So we'll see what happens when the voting comes," Tsolis said.

    Donovan has voted in line with the president's position 87 percent of the time, according to an analysis of Donovan's voting record by the website FiveThirtyEight, but he's broken with Trump occasionally, including on two major pieces of legislation: the president's tax reform bill and Affordable Care Act repeal.

    "The corporate portion of the tax bill was terrific for the nation," Donovan said. "On the individual side, it ended up [with] about four states paying for the tax cuts for the rest of the country."

    He objected to the $10,000 cap on deductions for state and local taxes, both of which are high in New York, and said he recently voted against making that portion of the tax bill permanent

    He also broke with Trump's plan to repeal and replace the ACA, often referred to as "Obamacare." The bill passed the House despite "no" votes from Donovan and other Republicans in Democratic states but narrowly failed in the Senate. Donovan opposed it on the grounds that it was a further tax.

    Still, Donovan's first thank-you after winning a primary against former Rep. Michael Grimm, who'd been forced out of office over tax fraud, went out to Trump, "the man that I have known for over 20 years, who had the confidence in me to be the lone Republican voice in New York City and stuck his neck out and told the world why he wanted me to be there in Washington with him." 

    Lafayette Curtis, 52, a self-described Jack-of-all-trades from the New Springville neighborhood, is a registered Democrat but has often voted for Republicans. He plans to vote for Donovan, despite his dislike for Trump. 

    "Dan has done a lot, even though there are some mixed emotions about certain things on Staten Island," Curtis said. "I've known him in public service from Borough Hall and over the years, straight on to district attorney, and he’s the man for Staten Island.”

    Rose has been critical of the president's relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin, attacks on the FBI and nomination of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. But he isn't opposed to Trump outright.

    "As I've said before, my mission is not to go to D.C. with a pitchfork in my hand," Rose said in a statement through his spokesperson, adding that he could work with Trump on things like draining the swamp and infrastructure.

    Asked if he would impeach the president, a Rose spokeswoman said it's not his focus and that he feels it wouldn't be responsible to comment on an active investigation.

    One of Rose's strengths has been his fundraising. He outraised Donovan by more than $1.4 million as of the end of September, and had $1.1 million more left to spend than Dononvan in the last month of the race, according to federal election filings.

    But Donovan made up most of the fundraising gap with support from $1 million in independent expenditures by outside groups, while Rose had less than $1,000. 

    Rose has sworn off donors for corporate PACs, but a significant portion of his donations came from out of state — about 37 percent, according to Open Secrets, a nonpartisan research group. Donovan received under 20 percent of his donations from out of state and heavily out-raised Rose among donors within the district itself.

    "Big Money Max Rose may have Big California Liberal dollars to fund his dishonest campaign – but he sure isn't one of us," said one post on his campaign’s Facebook page. 

    Rose rebutted in a statement, "You want to talk about Staten Island values, let’s talk about the fact that Dan Donovan took $10,000 from Purdue Executives. This guy is a Staten Island sellout."

    Rose is referring to Purdue Pharma, the company behind OxyContin, a prescription medicine whose marketing practices have been accused of contributing to the national opioid epidemic. (This year, the company stopped marketing OxyContin.)

    Staten Island is suffering immensely from the crisis. It had the highest overdose rate among New York City's boroughs in 2016, when the number of overdose deaths on Staten Island jumped 68 percent over the prior year, according to a report by Columbia University. Both candidates have taken a particular interest in the issue. 

    Rose was chief of staff for New York City health care nonprofit Brightpoint Health, which offers opioid treatment on Staten Island, and said he doesn't believe the right resources are being allocated toward fighting the epidemic. 

    "We need to significantly ramp up our investments in education and treatment and prevention and also law enforcement," he said. 

    Rose wants to roll back federal regulations on suboxone — a drug that is used to help treat opioid addiction — to expand access to nurses who use it as medically assisted treatment. He also wants more federal funding for clinics and recovery programs.

    To Donovan, it's personal: his father was an alcoholic, he said.

    "My father found recovery in the rooms of AA when I was 8 years old, so I understood recovery at a very early age and how it affects not only the individual, but the family," he said.

    He would like the National Institute of Health to tackle the development of non-addictive, non-opioid pain medication. 

    Muzzio said the fact that Rose is a veteran could appeal to voters in the district, home to many public servants, from military veterans police officers and firefighters.

    The district is "exactly the kind of place where people can use military service as a cue to prime them to think of a Democrat as somebody who could be credible on national defense issues," Ramapo College political science professor Jeremy Teigen, author of "Why Veterans Run," told The Associated Press.

    In fact, Rose's military background made him more appealing to Daniel Gonzalez, according to the 50-year-old construction worker and Democrat from Westerleigh.

    “I have a brother that served in the military. I have uncles that served in the military, Vietnam veterans," Gonzalez said.

    Browne, the St. John's political analyst, said Rose has a bold, "man on the move" way about him. But Donovan is a familiar face, and that can appeal to voters, too, he said.

    "There's a familiarity about him," Browne said. "A lot of people don’t like Congress in general, but they like their local member of Congress."

    NBC's Sierra Jackson and Asher Klein contributed to this report.


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    The social media site favored by a Pennsylvania man accused of gunning down 11 people at a synagogue on Saturday was inaccessible Monday, with Gab becoming the latest focal point in a battle over online hate speech and the platforms that host it.

    In an email Sunday, a GoDaddy spokesman said the company had given Gab 24 hours to find a new domain provider after finding "numerous" instances of content that promotes and encourages violence on the site, NBC News reported. PayPal said it was already in the process of canceling Gab’s account before Saturday’s shooting. Another payment service company Stripe, and Gab's web host, Joyent, were also dumping it.

    Gab, which says it has 800,000 users, bills itself as a champion of free speech. But it has also been criticized as a haven for the alt-right and a hotbed of racism, one that gained an audience hungry for extremist content after more mainstream platforms, particularly Twitter and Reddit, began to push hate speech off their services.

    "We have been systematically no-platformed by App Stores, multiple hosting providers, and several payment processors," a message on Gab's website said Monday.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images, File

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    A large-scale renovation, whether it involves a bathroom, a yard, a business, or even someplace huge, like an airport, is going to take time, patience, more time, more patience, and something to keep everyone's mood humming during what is always an up-down process.

    That "something" typically involves food, for no one likes to face a renovation while hangry.

    Thus it makes savory sense that, even before the mega, multi-month renovation of Music Center Plaza is complete, a new restaurant has debuted in the space.

    Upstage Burger is one of the first twinklings of what the freshly re-imagined space will deliver when it is totally completed in the spring of 2019, but you don't need to wait for that date to dig into delicious eats now.

    For the new burger shop, which is in a shipping container-esque structure near the southeast corner of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, just debuted in late October. That's right: Time, construction, and major renovation waits for no burger.

    And you needn't wait either, for the compact eatery, which overlooks Walt Disney Concert Hall at the corner of Grand Avenue and 1st Street, is serving up a made-to-order burger, cheeseburger, the vegetarian Impossible Burger, a hot dog and a crispy chicken sandwich, too.

    All of the not-so-pricey offerings have drama-related handles, highlighting their theater-close cred.

    Truffle cheese fries, beer-battered onion rings, and other sides round out the offerings.

    Call it a "permanent" sort of food truck, if you like, since Upstage Burger has a bit of that vibe, visually. But it isn't going anywhere, and, come the spring of 2019, it will be a part of the fully updated Music Center Plaza. 

    We'll raise an onion ring, and a cheeseburger, to that.



    Photo Credit: Upstage Burger

    A new burger joint just debuted at the southeast corner of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in DTLA. Upstage Burger is part of the refurbished look of Music Center Plaza, which is still undergoing a large-scale renovation.A new burger joint just debuted at the southeast corner of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in DTLA. Upstage Burger is part of the refurbished look of Music Center Plaza, which is still undergoing a large-scale renovation.

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    The snapshot-ready experience from Refinery29 will pop up, for a few short December days, at The Reef in DTLA; tickets are now on-sale.

    Photo Credit: Getty Images for Refinery29

    A walk-inside world of rooms designed by artists, helmed by companies, and dreamed-up by individuals? That's 29 Rooms from Refinery29, the stylish, forward-looking entertainment company. It is back in LA, in December, with a reality-expanding vibe, so grab your camera, a pal, and snap away.A walk-inside world of rooms designed by artists, helmed by companies, and dreamed-up by individuals? That's 29 Rooms from Refinery29, the stylish, forward-looking entertainment company. It is back in LA, in December, with a reality-expanding vibe, so grab your camera, a pal, and snap away.

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    Police shot and killed a man who had been fighting with an employee at a Hollywood gym after he grabbed an officer's stun gun, according to the Los Angeles Police Department.

    Police responded to the 24 Hour Fitness on in the 6300 block of Sunset Boulevard after a report of a man who confronted a gym employee. Officers were told the suspect, a man in his 30s, was in the gym locker room.

    When the man, his identity was not immediately available, grabbed an officer's stun gun during the locker room altercation, police opened fire, according to the LAPD.

    "Five minutes into my exercise, everybody starts frantically running back and forth, yelling, 'Active shooter,'" said gym member Brandon Lee. "I had my headphones in. I didn't really hear anything, but everyone was running around, so I knew something had just popped off."

    The man died at the scene.

    Yellow crime scene tape was placed across an entrance to the 24 Hour Fitness, located near the ArcLight Cinema Cinerama Dome.

    One officer was hospitalized with minor injuries.

    Details about the initial report that drew the police response were not immediately available.



    Photo Credit: KNBC-TV

    A police shooting was reported Monday Oct. 29, 2018 at a Hollywood gym.A police shooting was reported Monday Oct. 29, 2018 at a Hollywood gym.

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    Are you familiar with the 72-hour parking law? Basically, if you leave your car parked in a spot for longer than 72 hours -- even if there are no posted signs -- LA can ticket and impound your vehicle.

    NBC4's I-Team asked Mayor Eric Garcetti all about the law that most LA residents have never even heard of before. 

    What is LA doing to advertise or alert people about enforcement of the 72 hour parking law?

    "That law has been on the books for decades and it comes precisely because parking is at such a premium. That folks don’t want their car collection to be out there on the street...when they need a place to park or to have abandoned vehicles so it’s not that it’s 72 hours -- it’s 72 hours after somebody reports it.  That usually comes from a neighbor or somebody in the neighborhood... I think there's a good reason, whether it’s businesses that felt that people can’t get to their businesses, folks who are tenants or residents of an apartment building saying one person is hogging a space forever and not moving their car. The law came on the book as a result of every day Angelenos asking for it to be there. But I’m always open. We have a parking reform committee that is afforded a bunch of suggestions to us about how much we pay for parking, the timing...that’s something I’m certainly open too."

    Are you concerned the law is being used as retaliation in neighbor vs. neighbor disputes? And does enforcement go against city initiatives encouraging people to use public transportation?

    "Well, it’s on the books no matter what. So that is something that all citizens should know, all residents should know exists for 72-hour parking. If you are somebody who’s, for instance, taking public transportation, it’s a perfect time where we should be moving our cars some place else so that people who are using cars and need to park in front of an apartment building going to and from work have that space. 

    I don’t think that rules have to be always written in stone in a way that we can’t be human about them. They do exist, I think less out of retaliation than making sure everyone has a shot to have a parking space and that no body squats on that for too long."

    What do you say to people who live in apartment communities, who may not be allotted space for multiple vehicles and need to park on the street but get hit with $500 impound fees?

    "That’s definitely something that bears a conversation. It’s not a law that I created. It’s not a law that we’ve just put in place. It came out of what people wanted themselves. Somebody goes on vacation for a long time and you’re trying to get in an out, and that’s a precious space and somebody has two cars. You can understand the other side of that issue too so it’s never easy to resolve. I’m always interested in reaching out, in this individual case. But also looking at, 'Could this neighborhood have some other things posted?' If everybody agreed to that in the neighborhood, I’m always open to that change. But again, some people changing that may hurt other folks from being able to find a parking space."

    Was the intent of the rule to target abandoned and stored vehicles?

    "As somebody who was a councilman for many years, it wasn’t just for abandoned vehicles. I know that folks said, 'Hey, people who have an extra car or two extra cars are taking the space that I need in front of my building.' So it’s never quite as cut and clear as that but I do think that that’s a good reason to reopen that conversation work through our parking task force and see if that might be something we’re able to change in the future we want to do it carefully because the exception for one person often breaks the rule for everybody else and hard working, working class folks who have to depend on their car somebody who has a pick up truck who can’t take public transportation, works late hours may have that space taken away by somebody that says hey I’m going to keep it there but I think it does bear some investigation of whether or not we could do something like get a vacation pass for a week or get something where you can have an exeception or a short period of time."

    What do you say to critics who say the reason LA doesn’t advertise enforcement of the 72-hour parking law is because it’s a money maker for the city?

    "I’m the one who got rid of the red light cameras that used to give people huge tickets. I’ve always tried to reduce those amounts of things. I do know that folks need access. When somebody leaves a car for a long period of time, if they’re on vacation, if they can’t figure out another place to put it, park in an area that is acceptable or for us to figure out a system, then that hurts everybody in that area and that building. But I’m definitely open to that conversation and I appreciate the reporting. Maybe this is a good place where we can kick off with this person... We could come up with a better system."



    Photo Credit: KNBC-TV
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Are you familiar with the 72-hour parking law? Basically, if you leave your car parked in a spot for longer than 72 hours -- even if there are no posted signs -- LA can ticket and impound your vehicle.Are you familiar with the 72-hour parking law? Basically, if you leave your car parked in a spot for longer than 72 hours -- even if there are no posted signs -- LA can ticket and impound your vehicle.

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    In an era where active shooter has become standard speak, law enforcement and communities are taking steps to teach survival by hosting active-shooter classes.

    Here's what the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department recommends:

    • Know your escape routes
    • Designate safe rooms
    • Talk to your co-workers about a response
    • Keep emergency supplies (first aid kit, food, water) in every room
    • Identify ways to lock or barricade your area
    • Practice! Practice! Practice!

    Here's information to provide to in 911 calls:

    • Location of the shooter
    • Number of shooters
    • Physical description of shooters
    • Number and type of weapons shooter has
    • Number of potential victims at location

    Here's what to do when the shooting starts:

    Run

    • Have an escape route and an action plan in mind
    • Leave your belongings behind
    • Evacuate, regardless of whether others agree to follow
    • Help others escape, if possible
    • Do not attempt to move the wounded
    • Prevent others from entering an area where the active shooter may be located Keep your hands visible
    • Call 911 when you are safe

    Hide

    • Hide in an area out of the shooter's view
    • Silence your cell phone (including vibrate mode) and remain quiet and still
    • Lock doors and block entry to your hiding place (use chairs, tables, bookcases, file cabinets, etc.)
    • Shut off lights, stay out of sight and remain calm

    Fight

    • If your life is in imminent danger, you may have to fight the attacker
    • Attempt to incapacitate the shooter
    • Act with as much physical aggression as possible
    • Meet violence with violence
    • Improvise weapons such as chairs, fire extinguishers, books, and anything else you can use as an impact weapon
    • Do not back down
    • Commit to your actions
    • Stand united with others
    • Your life depends on it

    When the shooting stops:

    • Remain calm and reassure others that help is on the way.
    • Render first aid if necessary, utilizing what you have available.
    • For bleeding control, use first aid kits, towels, shirts, bed sheets, etc. For tourniquets, use power cords, phones cords, ropes, etc.
    • Stay inside your secured location until law enforcement comes to you
    • When law enforcement arrives, keep hands visible, spread fingers, leave all personal items behind, and calmly follow their directions
    • Understand that help may take an extended period of time due to clearing the entire location, but law enforcement will come to you.

    For more information, click here.


    San Bernardino County Sheriff's Deputy Justin Lane holds a session on surviving an active-shooter crisis in September 2018.San Bernardino County Sheriff's Deputy Justin Lane holds a session on surviving an active-shooter crisis in September 2018.

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    Assistant Chief Jorge A. Villegas was the subject of an LAPD internal affairs investigation in the weeks before he announced his retirement, multiple law enforcement sources have told NBC News.

    The investigation followed the receipt of two anonymous tips that made detailed, specific allegations about Villegas, the sources said. One of the tips was included in a letter; the other was left in a voicemail message.

    The nature of the accusations and the results of the internal affairs case were being closely guarded by the LAPD, that, like other police agencies in California, are required to keep misconduct allegations and disciplinary actions secret from the public.

    "Chief Villegas has indicated his intention to retire by the end of the year," LAPD public information officer Josh Rubenstein said in an email. "State law prohibits me from commenting any further on personnel matters."

    Villegas last appeared for work on Monday, October 22, and, according to Department insiders, stunned his staff and colleagues late in the day when he said he would not return to LAPD headquarters, and planned to use vacation time before officially retiring later this year.

    The LAPD said last week Chief Michel Moore will choose a successor for the Assistant Chief position in the coming weeks and Deputy Chief Jon Peters would take the job in the interim.

    Villegas had been in charge of administrative services, which included hiring, personnel, training, and other internal functions.


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